thermoacoustic engine

thermoacoustic engine

[¦thər·mō·ə¦kü·stik ′en·jən]
(engineering)
A heat engine that harnesses the combination of the pressure oscillations of a sound wave with the accompanying adiabatic temperature oscillations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike an internal-combustion engine, a thermoacoustic engine needs two heat exchangers to maintain the temperature gradient across the regenerator.
To minimize the amount of hardware at the hot temperature, a short thermal buffer tube is used adjacent to the hot heat exchanger in a traveling-wave thermoacoustic engine.
In a thermoacoustic engine, heat is converted to high intensity sound waves that can be harvested effectively into electricity.
It has been shown that the complex non-linear system of the thermoacoustic engine could be represented by a low order acoustic network with a simple non-linear term.
Objective: The eTAG (embedded ThermoAcoustic Generator) includes a novel electricity- generating thermoacoustic engine, embedded inside an existing residential boiler, to form a renewable and economic micro Combined Heat and Power (mCHP) system, without any hot moving parts.
A sampling of topics: dynamic energy absorption of circular honeycomb under in-plane impact loading, the effect of thermal properties of building glass on cooling energy consumption of buildings, integrated manufacturing of free-form surfaces, and a network model approach for investigation of regenerator on characteristic impedance in thermoacoustic engine, to name just a few.
Now researchers are developing alternative equipment that uses the environmentally benign gas helium and thermoacoustic engine technology.
The past 20 years have seen considerable progress in making efficient thermoacoustic engines, which convert heat energy into acoustic energy or utilize acoustic energy to pump heat from cold to hot regions.
The Penn State team has also built a solar-powered thermoacoustic engine that produces 120 decibels of sound, which may drive a thermoacoustic ice maker in the near future, and another unit that looks and operates much like a domestic refrigerator.
At NPS, early efforts focused primarily on prototypes providing low-temperature, low-capacity cooling, while at LANL, much of the work involved making large, thermoacoustic engines, using heat to generate sound, and sound to generate electrical power [see "Cooling With Sound," The World & I, September 1992, p.
One of these, the thermoacoustic engine, was covered in the Aug.
Symons, senior vice president for research and technical services at the American Frozen Food Institute (AFFI), in commenting on the Stirling engine, thermoacoustic engine, and propane.