thermoelectric


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thermoelectric

, thermoelectrical
1. of, relating to, used in, or operated by the generation of an electromotive force by the Seebeck effect or the Thomson effect
2. of, relating to, used in, or operated by the production or absorption of heat by the Peltier effect
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

thermoelectric

A thermoelectric module is a small, light-weight, and silent solid-state device that can operate as a heat pump or as an electrical power generator with no moving parts. Thermoelectric modules are durable, reliable, silent, lightweight, and compact green materials; they do not include compressed gases, chemicals, or toxic agents. See also: Smart materials
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References in periodicals archive ?
(11.) Pollock, D.D., "Thermoelectric Phenomena," CRC Handbook of Thermo electrics (Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1995), 7-17, ISBN:0-8493-0146-7.
(12.) Orr, B., Akbarzadeh, A., Mochizuki, M., and Singh, R., "A Review of Car Waste Heat Recovery Systems Utilising Thermoelectric Generators and Heat Pipes," Applied Thermal Engineering 101:490-495, 2016.
A., and Yang, Z., "Comprehensive Analysis of Thermoelectric Generation Systems for Automotive Applications," Applied Thermal Engineering 112:1433-1444, 2017.
et al., "Comparison and Parameter Optimization of a Two-Stage Thermoelectric Generator Using High Temperature Exhaust of Internal Combustion Engine," Applied Energy 130:190-199,2014.
(1) A thermoelectric device is a device which converts thermal energy directly into electricity and vice versa.
Salvador et al., "Multiple-filled skutterudites: High thermoelectric figure of merit through separately optimizing electrical and thermal transports," Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol.
Schujman, "Semiconducting Ge clathrates: promising candidates for thermoelectric applications," Applied Physics Letters, vol.
Nakamura, "High-temperature thermoelectric properties of NaxCoO2-[delta] single crystals," in Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Thermoelectrics (ICT '01), pp.
Funahashi, "Oxide thermoelectric materials: a nanostructuring approach," Annual Review of Materials Research, vol.
In order to improve the thermoelectric performance of [Bi.sub.2][Te.sub.3]-based thermoelectric materials, another effective way is to incorporate semimetal into the base thermoelectric materials.
The research on low-dimension and doping modification of semiconductor thermoelectric materials has promoted the development of semiconductor preparation technology.
The currently popular semiconductor thermoelectric materials are prepared by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), pulsed laser deposition technology (PLD), alloying technology, hydrothermal synthesis, sputtering deposition, flash evaporation, electrochemical preparation, laser cladding, magnetron sputtering (MS), high-pressure inert gas atomization (HP-GA), and metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) [41].