thermoelectric material

thermoelectric material

[¦thər·mō·i′lek·trik mə′tir·ē·əl]
(electronics)
A material that can be used to convert thermal energy into electric energy or provide refrigeration directly from electric energy; good thermoelectric materials include lead telluride, germanium telluride, bismuth telluride, and cesium sulfide.
References in periodicals archive ?
"One future benefit of this class of polymer material is the potential for a low-cost and abundant thermoelectric material that would have an inherently low thermal conductivity," said Yee, who directs the lab as part of the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering.
With a TEG unit, however, a thermoelectric material is interposed between the hot and the cold surfaces.
The system can evaluate small modules with 10 mm x 10 mm or less, module with a pair of thermoelectric materials and thermoelectric material alone.
Venkatasubramanian, "Nanostructured thermoelectric material and device technology for energy harvesting applications," in Proceedings of the 4th IEEE Nanotechnology Materials and Devices Conference (NMDC 10), pp.
The maximal ZT value of ~1.6 obtained following 650[degrees]C hot pressing is among the highest ever reported for any p-type thermoelectric material. Following the above conclusion, it seems possible to further enhance the obtained ZT values by annealing of the "50 [micro]m" powder following the hand crushing procedure, for relieving the associated strains, prior the 650[degrees] C hot pressing procedure.
Theconverse effect, that is, application of voltage to induce a temperature gradient across the thermoelectric material, was discovered by Jean Peltier [1] in 1834, and is thus called the Peltier effect.
It's the thermoelectric material's job to take that heat and turn it into something useful, like electricity.
The pot features strips of ceramic thermoelectric material that generate electricity through temperature differentials between the 550 degrees Celsius at the bottom of the pot and the water boiling inside at 100 degrees.
Two functional principles are included under this term: The popular Peltier-Effect describes how electric current flowing through thermoelectric material transports heat, creating a cooling effect.
The efficiency of a thermoelectric material is directly related to the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT given by [[alpha].sup.2] [sigma]T/[kappa] where [sigma] is the electrical conductivity, [kappa] is the thermal conductivity, and T is the absolute temperature.
Bismuth sulfide has numerous potential applications in the fields of thermoelectrics (V-VI semiconductor, same type with the benchmark thermoelectric material [Bi.sub.2][Te.sub.3])and photodiode arrays and photovoltaics (due to the possibility of tuning different sizes of sub components).
In a Peltier cooler, DC current is forced through a thermoelectric material, removing heat from one junction and creating a cold side and hot side.