thermoelectromotive force

thermoelectromotive force

[¦thər·mō·i¦lek·trə¦mōd·iv ′fȯrs]
(electricity)
Voltage developed due to differences in temperature between parts of a circuit containing two or more different metals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The thermoelectromotive force, that is, the Seebeck coefficient of the prepared InSe and AlSe bilayer thin films with different thickness ratios and annealing temperatures is shown in Figures 11-14.
The objective of this study was to examine the effect of structural changes during annealing on the electrical resistivity and thermoelectromotive force of a thermocouple made of electrodeposited nanostructured [Ni.sub.85.8][Fe.sub.10.6][W.sub.1.4][Cu.sub.2.2] alloy and copper and to use the experimental results to establish correlations between structural changes, electrical properties, and thermoelectromotive force.
Thermoelectromotive force (TEMF) was measured using the nanostructured [Ni.sub.85.8][Fe.sub.10.6][W.sub.1.4][Cu.sub.2.2] alloy-Cu thermocouple, obtained by the mechanical coupling of the pressed powder sample and copper wire.
The electron density of states was determined from the temperature dependence of the thermoelectromotive force (TEMF) of the copper-nanostructured alloy thermocouple.
Heating the powder sample pressed at 500 MPa in the temperature range of 25[degrees]C to 600[degrees]C induces structural changes in the alloy which cause changes in the electrical resistivity and thermoelectromotive force of the nanostructured [Ni.sub.85.8][Fe.sub.10.6][W.sub.1.4][Cu.sub.2.2] alloy-copper thermocouple.
Chiriac, "Thermoelectromotive force in nanocrystalline wires," Nanostructured Materials, vol.
Nagacevschi, "Thermoelectromotive force in magnetic amorphous-crystalline Fe79Si5B16 wire systems," Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, vol.
During the model development, thermoelectromotive force E of this additional electron source has been also included.
Acceptable accuracy of temperature measurement has been rated as "Class 1," which is the highest precision (least tolerance) under the standards of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), providing almost same thermoelectromotive force characteristic as pure platinum currently used on the negative electrode.
But in all these systems it is difficult to eliminate the presence of parasitic thermoelectromotive forces and also changing contact resistances.