thief

(redirected from thievish)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

thief

[′thēf]
(petroleum engineering)
In the petroleum industry, a device that permits the taking of samples from a predetermined location in the liquid body to be sampled.
References in periodicals archive ?
Li's final satirical twist occurs when the telescope is transformed from a voyeur's exotic prop into an oracle worshipped in the new ancestral hall, which, ironically enough, is the former Summer Pavilion, and Jiren, now the new master, is ridiculed by the maids as "Master Thievish Eyes.
Having a big body by itself didn't turn out to be strongly associated with thievish families.
91) At the other end of the social spectrum, James I told his son Henry that hunting with hounds was the most noble sport, "for it is a thievish forme of hunting to shoote with gunnes and bowes.
Aware of this imperative, Life and Debt is a thievish act that spirits Jamaica away from its anchor in the popular paradise imagery and relocates it in the uncertain oceans of the postcolonial dependencies that so condition its political and economic geographies.
They are in fact a low thievish set even to each other.
46) As one heralded circle claimed, it is the departure from the uniform, uneven sides and unequal angles, which should be deplored rather than the character and deeds of the offending figure: "[W]hy blame a lying, thievish Isosceles when you ought rather to deplore the incurable inequality of his sides?
JONATHAN BOOTHMAN, an Englishman, 23 Years of Age, five Feet five Inches high, of a dark brown Complexion, and a thievish Look; he had on a white Cotton Waistcoat, and Trousers.
In 1882, Boyd (1974:219) in a chapter on the 'Noble savage' notes that when the term was 'stripped of poetical imagery, nothing but a sneaking, filthy, thievish, murdering vagabond' was revealed.
All these years dealing with thieves in a thievish city.
Lines such as 'Time's thievish progress to eternity' and 'Love comforteth like sunshine after rain' illustrate the literary genius of the man from Warwickshire, and Colin Burrow's editing of the book provides an invaluable scholarly analysis, running to some 150 pages, of Shakespeare the poet, the poems and the controversies they have provoked.
This degradation consists both in suffering the act of searching and classing of intelligent and honest white men with raw and thievish natives, which must inevitably lower the moral tone and social stares of hundreds of citizens.
They are indued with good natural Wits, are ingenious, nimble, and active, when they are minded; but generally very lazy and thievish, and will not work except forced by Hunger.