Passchendaele

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Related to third battle of Ypres: battle of Caporetto

Passchendaele

a village in NW Belgium, in West Flanders province: the scene of heavy fighting during the third battle of Ypres in World War I during which 245 000 British troops were lost
References in periodicals archive ?
IT WAS officially known as the Third Battle of Ypres, but history recalls the horror in one word: Passchendaele.
And it was the eagle eyed Tim without the aid of a metal detector who found the dog tag Horror Body of a soldier lies in the smashed remains of a German gun emplacement during the Third Battle of Ypres in which Alfred was involved
I thought about my great uncle Norman at the Third Battle of Ypres a century ago and of his brother, my grandfather Nelson, being taken prisoner of war at St Valery some 23 years later.
He later served as a private in the 2/6th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment and was killed at the Third Battle of Ypres. He was 35.
Lieutenant Ulrich Burke 2nd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment 1917 - THIRD BATTLE OF YPRES
| Stockton man Sergeant Edward Cooper won the Victoria Cross during the Third Battle of Ypres on August 16, 1917.
1917: The third battle of Ypres ended when British and Canadian troops captured Passchendaele Ridge.
1917 - Canadian troops capture the village of Passchendaele in the Third Battle of Ypres.
He describes all of the major actions and incidents they were involved in from 1916 up to the Third Battle of Ypres, including the Battle of the Somme and in Mesopotamia, Salonika, Egypt, and Palestine, as well as the stories of soldiers.
The Third Battle of Ypres. The Ypres-Zonnebeke Road; men filling in recent shell-holes, showing wrecked transport and their split loads of shells.
Whereas over two thirds of the 12,000 burials in nearby Tyne Cot Cemetery, the main cemetery of the particularly dreadful Third Battle of Ypres (1917), or simply Passchendaele, are 'Known unto God,' those brought to Remy Siding, the name by which the British came to refer to Lijssenthoek, were usually alive, and hence identifiable.