third law of motion


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third law of motion

[′thərd ′lȯ əv ′mō·shən]
(mechanics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Using the diagram on page 5, explain how the forces involved in a concussion relate to Newton's Third Law of Motion. (A hit to the head is the action force.
NEWTON's third law of motion states that every action has an equal and opposite reaction.
Newton's Third Law of Motion says that if you apply a force to anything it will push back just as hard.
Tucson, AZ, June 29, 2013 --(PR.com)-- The Third Law of Motion: Meg Files's newest novel is set in Michigan in the early 1960s, when domestic violence remained hidden in silent basements and the worst thing a girl could do was to get herself “in trouble.” It tells the stories of Dulcie White, a bright, confused college girl distracted by sexual discovery and the power of her boyfriend's neediness, and track star Lonnie Saxbe, caught up in his own confusions and compulsions.
SPACE and Nehru Planetarium encourages mass participation of all space science enthusiasts and students in this water rocketry workshop/competition as it is an example of Newton's third law of motion and explains a difficult concept of science and general physics in an entertaining way.
Newton Running shoes, says Abshire, were based on the findings of Sir Isaac himself, specifically, the third law of motion: "For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction."
This is Newtown's third law of motion - for every force there is an equal force in the opposite direction.
Newton's third law of motion famously explains that the force interaction between two objects is always equal and opposite.
According to Newton's third law of motion, "for every action there is always an equal and opposite reaction." Geopolitics has a similar law: whenever the world sees a new emerging power, the world's greatest existing power tries, directly or indirectly, to block its rise.
The most surprising example of scientific inaccuracy in Astronautics is his apparent misunderstanding of Newton's third law of motion: for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.
Action and reaction, Lydia thought, yet another example of Newton's third law of motion. She said, "Be careful."