ventricle

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ventricle

Anatomy
1. a chamber of the heart, having thick muscular walls, that receives blood from the atrium and pumps it to the arteries
2. any one of the four main cavities of the vertebrate brain, which contain cerebrospinal fluid
3. any of various other small cavities in the body
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ventricle

[′ven·trə·kəl]
(anatomy)
A chamber, or one of two chambers, in the vertebrate heart which receives blood from the atrium and forces it into the arteries by contraction of the muscular wall.
One of the interconnecting, fluid-filled chambers of the vertebrate brain that are continuous with the canal of the spinal cord.
(zoology)
A cavity in a body part or organ.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
We found that the degree of hydrocephalus in patients with tumor located in the lateral or third ventricle was significantly higher than in those with tumors located in the fourth ventricle, while the incidence of acute hydrocephalus was much higher in the fourth ventricle (72.2%).
Different approaches to the anterior third ventricle have been described; among them are the trans-cortical, the subfrontal, and the interhemispheric transcallosal.
In 1921, Dandy was the first neurosurgeon who successfully removed a colloid cyst from the third ventricle through a posterior transcallosal approach2.
Caption: Figure 3: Intratumoral hemorrhage with mass expansion and complete occlusion of the third ventricle.
Endoscopy or microsurgery: is the never-ending debate concerning the choice of surgical strategy for colloid cysts of the third ventricle still a topical issue or has it been resolved World Neurosurgery.
Colloid cysts of the third ventricle are rare intracranial neoplasm and can affect young individuals.
(g- l) NSC-GFP cells transplanted into the lateral ventricle (LV) nestled within the choroid plexus (g) or adhered to the walls of the lateral ventricles (h, i) and were also found within the third ventricle (j).
We centrally administered 50 [micro]g/mL DNJ (1 [micro]L) or vehicle as a control into the third ventricle of HFD-fed obese mice and LFD-fed control mice.
The frequency of involvement of areas from most to least common are as follows: symmetrical lesions of the medial thalami, periventricular regions of the third ventricle, peri-aqueductal areas, mamillary bodies, tectal plate and dorsal medulla.[3]
Central neurocytomas are typically midline supratentorial tumors located in the lateral or third ventricles in the region of the foramen of Monro, arising from the septum pellucidum, fornix, or walls of the lateral ventricles.
The first MRI of the head showed a small colloid cyst in the third ventricle (Figure 1a).
An ectopic posterior pituitary gland is a rare condition and may present with an empty pituitary fossa, hypoplasia or absence of the infundibular stalk and resultant short stature due to growth hormone deficiency.[1] It may be associated with septo-optic dysplasia, Chiari I malformation, agenesis of the corpus callosum, Kallmann sydrome and peri-ventricular heterotopias.[1,2] The location of the ectopic lobe can vary, but it is most commonly located along the median eminence in the floor of the third ventricle.[1,2]