third-party cookie


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Related to third-party cookie: Browser cookie, HTTP cookies

third-party cookie

A small amount of text stored in the user's computer that is created by a website with a domain name other than the one the user is currently visiting. By default, third-party cookies are often allowed by a Web browser; however, they may be blocked, as they are widely used by advertisers to track browsing history. See cookie and first-party cookie.
References in periodicals archive ?
WebTrends said that initial migrations to its first-party cookie solution have resulted in a 300% increase in accuracy in comparison to third-party cookie data.
Omniture doesn't encourage third-party cookies -- and Parkin claims that most people who delete cookies delete those of the third-party variety (a user can specify the level of cookie deletion through a Web browser's security filter).
More than a year ago, WebTrends identified Retail as being the industry vertical most affected by third-party cookie rejection, occurring at a rate 21% greater than the average across all verticals.
Together, the growth in third-party cookie rejection and the confidence gap in using measurement to optimize web marketing efforts, will drive business professionals to more deeply understand their metrics, which is a great thing in the long run," said Greg Drew, WebTrends CEO and president.
With WebTrends first-party cookie support, marketers and business managers can avoid the inaccuracies caused by third-party cookie rejection and deletion rates without losing any existing data contained in third-party cookies as information is automatically transferred to new first-party cookies.
WebTrends' research indicates the following industry verticals are experiencing third-party cookie rejection at the following rates:
Blocking all cookies may make it difficult to use some websites, so look for a setting that blocks third-party cookies.
Guidelines from Adblock Plus, Interactive Advertising Bureau's (IAB) LEAN initiative, and others suggest lighter ad loads, better policing of third-party cookies, and less intrusive units.
Considering this overall number--16,555, the following findings have been considered in our research: 3 times more third-party cookies as opposed to first-party cookies; 2302 session cookies and 14,253 persistent cookies; 22 sites used more than 100 cookies (in media and e-commerce sectors); 3 first party cookies with 7,985 years duration (expiry date in 9999); 415 sites set 8,472 third-party cookies; only 7 web sites were with no cookies (public sector); 59% used the banner to notify the users, while 39% used the link method, and 29% (116 websites) used no notification means; 57% of the websites provided sufficient level of information to the data subjects/users.
Such third-party cookies are often sanctioned by the visited Web site to build consumer profiles by the third party organisation for targeted marketing purposes.
Third-party cookies are cookies placed on a visitor's hard drive after clicking on an advertisement or other content that is hosted by the initial website that person visited.