thorium nitrate

thorium nitrate

[′thȯr·ē·əm ′nī‚trāt]
(inorganic chemistry)
Th(NO3)4·4H2O Explosive white crystals soluble in water and alcohol, strong oxidizer; the anhydrous form decomposes at 500°C; used in medicine and as an analytical reagent.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Uranyl Nitrate and Thorium Nitrate were both being held in the redundant bonded source store.
For ethyl alcohol to burn brightly as in commercial alcohol lamps, it has to use the Welzbach incandescent mantle, a cotton packet impregnated with 95 percent thorium nitrate and 1 percent cerium nitrate.
For long decades thorium has been widely applied in a diversity of implementations like a fertile material in nuclear power reactors, refractory material for crucibles, tubes, rods, etc., anti-reflection coating in optics, making ceramics, gas lantern mantles, additive for special glass, alloying metal for some aerospace industry and aviation components, welding alloys, stopper crystalline growth of W and to increase time of use of light bulbs, catalyst in organic chemistry, additive in wolfram filaments of magnetron tubes, reagent in chemistry laboratories (as thorium nitrate), fuel for generating nuclear energy etc.
Th-ING: Thorium Is Now Green technology begins with thorium nitrate, which is reacted with aqueous hydrochloric acid under mild conditions.
He tried many substances that would glow at high heat without melting and finally found that if he impregnated a cylindrical fabric with thorium nitrate, to which a small amount of cerium nitrate (a compound of one of the rare earth elements) had been added, he would obtain a brilliant white glow in a gas flame.