three-dimensional flow

three-dimensional flow

[′thrē di¦men·chən·əl ′flō]
(fluid mechanics)
Any fluid flow which is not a two-dimensional flow.
References in periodicals archive ?
The principal vehicle for deriving appropriate predictive models for the behaviour of the evolving three-dimensional flow for both problems will be the long-wave approximation; the resulting equation set will be solved computationally using state-of-the-art numerical approximations and convergence acceleration algorithms, utilising parallel programming and computing platforms as necessary.
The model comes with simplifications to introduce the three-dimensional flow pattern into a one-dimensional calculation.
Experimental investigation of the three-dimensional flow velocity components in a 180 degree sharp bend.
However, this problem is not clearly understood because of its complexity and the strong three-dimensional flow behavior.
Studies have shown that DES offers a clear advantage over RANS models in terms of the force coefficients, pressure coefficients distribution and capture of the three-dimensional flow feature [14], [15].
For the three-dimensional flow and heat transfer study, the continuity equation, momentum conservation equation, and energy conservation equation were established.
Various workers [8-11] also investigated three-dimensional flow viscous fluid past a porous plate under different physical conditions.
Pop, Three-dimensional flow over a stretching surface in a viscoelastic fluid, Nonlinear Analysis: Real World Applications, 9 (2008) 1811-1822.
Flow in an impoundment branching is inherently a three-dimensional flow and has complexities.
The present study seeks to quantitatively elucidate the mechanism for the effectiveness of the BMS configuration for glass-fiber bundle dispersion using three-dimensional flow analysis.
SolidWorks solid-modeling CAD software from Dassault Systemes SolidWorks Corp., Waltham, Mass, (solidworks.com), has added polyXtrue as one of its Solution Partner Products; as a result, designers and engineers can combine the two to simulate three-dimensional flow through extrusion dies to optimize the geometry, processing conditions, and material selection for both monolayer and coextrusion dies.
The above equation system is valid for the case of different applied magnetic fields and a fully three-dimensional flow. It can, however, also be adapted to the essentially two-dimensional case of slab-casting, where only one (basically vertical) magnetic field [B.sub.0,z] is applied.

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