threnody


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threnody

, threnode
an ode, song, or speech of lamentation, esp for the dead
References in periodicals archive ?
When I first encountered the Robocobra Quartet - hearing what I wrote off to be a messy cocophany called 'Threnody for Vengaboyz', I wrote them off.
Morfydd Owen's Threnody for the Passing of Branwen, 1916, was dedicated to Nelson Mandela and was similar to another piece in the programme, Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings.
Each of the relationships built upon natural procreation by man and woman is an aspect of a Love that transcends them all, and so is described by David in his threnody as brotherhood, espousal, and parenthood.
From this perspective, we should not underestimate the strain of mysticism in Leckey's practice, from the threnody to rave culture embedded in the 1999 video Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore, to the open-eyed, and open-ended, wonder driving the TED-style 2009 lecture-performance Mark Leckey in the Long Tail.
The first half of the program ended with Threnody I and II by Aaron Copland.
Murray Schafer's Threnody when I was in high school.
It is a young writer's book--Wolfe was in his late 20s when it was published--and it is a marvelous book to read when one is young, lonely and unsure, desperate to become real and protect oneself from "school, society, all the barbarous invasions of the world." It's excessive, indulgent (originally he wanted to title it "O Lost!" or "Alone, Alone"), mythopoetic, a threnody of loss defined and undefinable.
Here, rather than encountering the expected threnody in which the beauty of a dying woman would be classically glorified, as the character fades into death, description centers on the flow of blood from the sliced carotid artery and details the emergence of laughter instead of mourning.
Fusing elements of death, thrash and progressive metal with electronica and industrial beats, Engel has distinguished themselves on the world stage with two critically-acclaimed international releases (2007's Absolute Design and 2010's Threnody) and relentless touring.
In the AIDS era, there was Thom Gunn's collection, The Man with Night Sweats (1992), a threnody for the plague victims that can only be read with pauses for reflection; Michael Cunningham's novel, The Hours (1998); and especially Larry Kramer's justifiably angry documentary-style drama, The Normal Heart (1985).
Featuring Stephen Montague's Dark Sun, a threnody to the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the piece will form the climax of the Festival with a public performance in the surroundings of Pritchard Jones Hall.
Images of wartime deprivation, close-knit communities, quiet backwaters, seaside outings and 1960s high-rise flats cumulatively created a threnody to a disappearing working-class Britain.