thrift

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thrift:

see leadwortleadwort
, common name for the Plumbaginaceae, a family of perennial herbs and shrubs usually found in semiarid regions, especially of the Mediterranean area and Central Asia. Several species—e.g.
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.

thrift

Rare vigorous thriving or growth, as of a plant

thrift

any of numerous perennial plumbaginaceous low-growing plants of the genus Armeria, esp A. maritima, of Europe, W Asia, and North America, having narrow leaves and round heads of pink or white flowers
References in periodicals archive ?
Californians are an idle, thriftless people, and can make nothing of
This certainly was "a thriftless sort of charity", to use his own phrase, which did not cause him much sacrifice, although he was generous in absolute terms [Scott, 1821, p.
When my grandmother died, we discovered she'd been living for almost thirty years on sixteen thousand dollars a year, roughly half of which she was giving away, mostly to her confused and thriftless grandchildren.
Under these conditions, laborers had become a type of migrant construction worker, often homeless, thriftless, uneducated, and wandering from job to job.
It was from the borderline group of mental deficients which were `recruited many of the social parasites of our civilisation--the unemployable and thriftless, prostitutes, delinquents, and criminals, and intensifies such problems as illegitimacy and venereal disease.
soil, naturally thin, had been exhausted by many years of thriftless
Congressional Record quotes an unnamed speaker as saying "an idle and thriftless race of savages cannot be permitted to stand guard at the treasure vaults of the nation which hold our gold and silver.
The cost of poor relief spiralled in the opening two decades of the nineteenth century in response to rising need, but as food prices eventually retreated to well below their wartime peaks and the general level of real wages began to improve significantly, the age-old dilemma of how to provide adequately for the prudent and industrious who fell upon hard times without blunting the spur of necessity to the thriftless and the indolent came to dominate the poverty debate.
The bankers knew they were lending money to a man who ran a tight ship, who was not thriftless or mad.