thud

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thud

(1)
Yet another metasyntactic variable (see foo). It is reported that at CMU from the mid-1970s the canonical series of these was "foo", "bar", "thud", "blat".

thud

(2)
Rare term for the hash character, "#" (ASCII 35). See ASCII for other synonyms.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Among toon fare, Xilam unveiled short-format "Mr Baby," about a toddler who talks like a 50-year-old smartass; and, most memorably, first episode excerpts from the big-budget "Rahan," a thuddingly scored comedic fantasy-adventure series set in 35,000 B.C.
Time and again, however, aud is forced to endure a painfully obvious setup, followed by a thuddingly unfunny payoff.
Jim Page's editing is razor-sharp, while the tense, Bernard Herrmann-esque strings of Geoff Zanelli's score are suitably sexed up with thuddingly percussive beats and a smattering of rock tunes.
Lucy Spiller Courteney Cox Don Konkey Ian Hart Holt MeLaren Josh Stewart Brent Barrow Jeffrey Nordling Julia Mallory Laura Allen Leo Spiller Will MeCormack FX's enviable reputation with originals is stained by "Dirt," a Hollywood-centric series about tabloid gossip that yearns to be "Entourage" with edge and settles for being a trashy version of "Just Shoot Me." Capturing journalism onscreen is always a dicey proposition, and despite Courteney Cox's marquee value as star-exec producer--the fourth "Friends" alum to mount a "TV return--the show falls thuddingly flat, feeling tired, gratuitous in its dirty doings and a trifle narcissistic, what with Cox and husband David Arquette's involvement loosely echoing the showbiz couple prominently featured in the serialized story.
version of "Teachers" has lost much of its grit and feels thuddingly conventional.
Lulled by the funeral pacing and thuddingly predictable dialogue, the viewer is likely to forget about the characters, who are forever hanging around in medium shot, and start cataloguing the furniture.
"Island in the Sun" is a thuddingly earnest study of interracial politics and love, but commentary from film historian John Stanley happily dismisses the notion of quality.
The 1994 genocide in Rwanda serves as the springboard for emotive but thuddingly didactic drama in helmer Raoul Peck's "Sometimes in April," competing in Berlin against similarly themed but glossier "Hotel Rwanda." Peck's pic gets its hands dirtier by swimming in muddy waters of moral responsibility through the story of a fractured family living through the war's atrocities and still dealing with the aftermath 10 years on.
Nunn's directorial embellishment is of a piece with a play that isn't shy about facing up to death, as Berowne will remark in an eleventh-hour comment to his beloved Rosaline (a sparkling Kate Fleetwood) that "mirth cannot move a soul in agony." But just as Nunn's previous National "Summerfolk" added on a coda that made what was politically implicit in Gorky's play thuddingly obvious, Nunn seems here to be working too hard on behalf of a play whose own summery passages are sufficiently flecked with pathos as it is.