thylacine


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thylacine

(thī`ləsīn') or

Tasmanian wolf,

carnivorous marsupialmarsupial
, member of the order Marsupialia, or pouched mammals. With the exception of the New World opossums and an obscure S American family (Caenolestidae), marsupials are now found only in Australia, Tasmania, New Guinea, and a few adjacent islands.
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, or pouched mammal, of New Guinea, Australia, and Tasmania, presumed extinct since 1936. The thylacine is often cited as an example of convergent evolution: It was superficially quite similar to a wolf or dog, although it had evolved entirely independently of these animals. About the size of a collie, it had a long tail and a wolflike head with short ears; its large jaws were relatively weak. Its coat was brownish with a series of black stripes across the back, and it was also known as the Tasmanian tiger. A nocturnal hunter, the thylacine probably preyed on small animals. The female gave birth to very undeveloped young, which were then carried in a pouch surrounding the teats. By the time of European settlement, thylacines had become extinct or nearly so everywhere except Tasmania, and there they were aggressively hunted because of their reputed attacks on sheep and poultry; its jaws, however, make it unlikely that it could have easily killed sheep. Habitat loss, the introduction of dogs, and other factors also probably contributed to their extinction. The last known thylacine died in captivity in the Hobart Zoo in 1936; reported sightings since then in Australia and Tasmania are unconfirmed. Thylacines are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Marsupialia, family Dasyuridae.
References in periodicals archive ?
The species assemblage of quolls that exists in Tasmania exhibits no patterning when it occurs in the absence of the devil and the thylacine on the southeastern mainland of Australia (Table 6; [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3 OMITTED]).
The contrast between the harsh sepia-toned pages that frame the poetry of the thylacine in captivity and the bold, vibrant wordless colour of the creature in its beautiful bush setting is extremely effective.
1967) Discovery of a Thylacine (Tasmanian tiger) carcase in a cave near Eucla, Western Australia.
The Australian government wrote of the bizarre animal: "With a head like a wolf, striped body like a tiger and backward facing pouch like a wombat, the thylacine was as unbelievable as the platypus which had caused disbelief and uproar in Europe when it was first describeda[bar] The name 'tiger' refers to the animal's stripes and not its temperament.
The pipeline will also make it possible for gas from Origin's offshore fields, Thylacine and Geographe, in the Otway Basin, to be piped to markets in Victoria and South Australia, as well as linking South Australia's gas system to the TXO underground gas storage facility, at Port Campbell in Victoria.
Although Koolan 2 contains identified remains of Sarcophilus, Thylacine and Dasyurus hallucatus (Northern Quoll), the bone assemblage is much less reduced than that from Serpent's Glen, Puntutjarpa or Intitjikula.
Among the highlights of the site are the only surviving film of the extinct thylacine (Tasmanian tiger) and the last known shot of the golden toad.
Otway Gas Project consists of two offshore gas fields, Geographe and Thylacine, and an onshore gas processing facility near Port Campbell in south-west Victoria.
Additional reserves have been identified in Origin's offshore fields, Thylacine and Geographe (Otway Basin).
The Last Tasmanian Tiger: The History and Extinction of the Thylacine
The last known Tasmanian Tiger, or Thylacine, died in captivity in 1936, but a team of biologists believe the animal's extinction may simply be a 70-year hiccup.
The cover bears an emotive image of a lonely thylacine standing atop a rock and giving voice to its woe across an unfeeling landscape.