thylacine

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Related to thylacines: Tasmanian wolf, Tasmanian tiger

thylacine

(thī`ləsīn') or

Tasmanian wolf,

carnivorous marsupialmarsupial
, member of the order Marsupialia, or pouched mammals. With the exception of the New World opossums and an obscure S American family (Caenolestidae), marsupials are now found only in Australia, Tasmania, New Guinea, and a few adjacent islands.
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, or pouched mammal, of New Guinea, Australia, and Tasmania, presumed extinct since 1936. The thylacine is often cited as an example of convergent evolution: It was superficially quite similar to a wolf or dog, although it had evolved entirely independently of these animals. About the size of a collie, it had a long tail and a wolflike head with short ears; its large jaws were relatively weak. Its coat was brownish with a series of black stripes across the back, and it was also known as the Tasmanian tiger. A nocturnal hunter, the thylacine probably preyed on small animals. The female gave birth to very undeveloped young, which were then carried in a pouch surrounding the teats. By the time of European settlement, thylacines had become extinct or nearly so everywhere except Tasmania, and there they were aggressively hunted because of their reputed attacks on sheep and poultry; its jaws, however, make it unlikely that it could have easily killed sheep. Habitat loss, the introduction of dogs, and other factors also probably contributed to their extinction. The last known thylacine died in captivity in the Hobart Zoo in 1936; reported sightings since then in Australia and Tasmania are unconfirmed. Thylacines are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Marsupialia, family Dasyuridae.
References in periodicals archive ?
As evidenced by the petroglyphs, it is after the disappearance of thylacines that the imagery coalesced into definitive emblematic representations of the mythology.
Many are regarded as images of the thylacine, an animal that disappeared from mainland Australia some 3000-4000 years ago.
The researchers then inserted into mice a piece of thylacine DNA that controls production of a collagen gene.
The area also provided habitat for thylacines, and most sheep losses were attributed to the thylacine, although wild dogs may also have caused losses (Guiler 1985).
com reported that beginning in 1886, the Tasmanian government encouraged residents to hunt down thylacines and paid bounties for those who snared more than 2000 carcasses.
However, the newly discovered painting has several features that set it apart from others thought to depict thylacines.
These have been interpreted as thylacines (Brandl 1972; Wright 1972; Lewis 1977; Mulvaney this issue), which are now extinct.
Scientific rational argument and raw spontaneous emotion are fused in a register which carries both sorrow and the hope: Lake Pedder the Franklin Maralinga Roxby Rum Jungle Rabbits Ranger Hinchinbrook Daintree Coode Island Coronation Hill Jabiluka Dieldrin Cane Toads Cape Barren Geese Feral Cats Terrania Creek Wittenoom Fraser Island Farmhouse Creek Thylacines Numbats Nufarm Nightcap Nurunga.
Tasmanian devils and thylacines once ranged over much of the Australian continent.
The Aboriginal people have occupied the Kakadu area near-continuously for at least 40,000 years, and there are more than 5,000 recorded art sites, including cave paintings and rock carvings of long-extinct giant kangaroos and thylacines.
AT 6pm, on September 6, 1936, the last captive thylacine - or Tasmanian tiger - died in Hobart Zoo.
The last Thylacine (also known as the Tasmanian tiger, or Tasmanian wolf, though it was neither tiger nor wolf) died in captivity in 1936, a sad end to an animal that once roamed Australia, Papua New Guinea, and Tasmania.