thymele

thymele

In the orchestra of an ancient Greek theater, a small altar dedicated to Bacchus; usually at the center of the orchestra circle and marked by a white stone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thymele. Recherches sur la signification et la destination des monuments circulaires dans larchitecture religieuse de la Grece.
In her next letter, from February 27, 1845, she clarifies that she does not mean to "blaspheme the Drama"--just that the contemporary theater "vulgarizes" the work of noble dramatists such as himself, as it has "no altar" and "the thymele ...
The fact that the altar (thymele) present in the center of the tragic space is a god's altar or is eschara, the par excellence seat of the sacrifices made as offerings to the missing heroes, means however that in this center of the tragic space stands the dialogue with death and with divine powers." (Borie 2007: 62)
Thymele, waiting-woman to the queen and Princess Eudina, explains the subsequent events leading to the information's preservation:
(55) In response to Thymele's suggestion that Geron loves her, Doris evocatively describes her objection to Geron's advances and his offer to bind her in marriage:
In the 2009 production of Dimiter Gotscheff's Persians, for example, the audience was exasperated every time the actors set foot on the ancient thymele, the altar of the god Dionysus, which is not meant to be stepped over according to a well-established Greek theater custom.
The Greeks received Mounet-Sully's CEdipe with enthusiasm; it is thus remarkable that one of the few negative responses the performance elicited bemoaned the failure of the set design to represent the spatial conventions of Greek theaters: there was "neither orchestra with the thymele in the middle for the chorus or any other of the divisions of the ancient skene [stage-building]" (21)
The first day was consecrated to choruses called dithyrambs (dithurambos, probably the double thriambos, which gave the latin name triumphus), eulogies in honour of the gods: fifty men danced and sang around Dionysus' altar (altar called thymele) to the sound of flutes and tambourines, on the Agora not far from the altar of the twelve gods.
(25.) We discovered in production that the thymele ("altar") traditionally located at the center point needs to be removed for this drama, and replaced by a prop altar at front center.
One is that the so-called thymele or central ritual altar of Dionysus might have been used.
The suggestion, then, is that Prometheus was bound in the central orchestra to the thymele or some alternative structure and that the action of the play took place in the orchestra around him.