thymele

thymele

In the orchestra of an ancient Greek theater, a small altar dedicated to Bacchus; usually at the center of the orchestra circle and marked by a white stone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thymele, waiting-woman to the queen and Princess Eudina, explains the subsequent events leading to the information's preservation:
In the 2009 production of Dimiter Gotscheff's Persians, for example, the audience was exasperated every time the actors set foot on the ancient thymele, the altar of the god Dionysus, which is not meant to be stepped over according to a well-established Greek theater custom.
The Greeks received Mounet-Sully's CEdipe with enthusiasm; it is thus remarkable that one of the few negative responses the performance elicited bemoaned the failure of the set design to represent the spatial conventions of Greek theaters: there was "neither orchestra with the thymele in the middle for the chorus or any other of the divisions of the ancient skene [stage-building]" (21)
In marked contrast to the earlier adjustment of the Odeion to the conventions of a closed theater, in the production of Oedipus Tyrannus in 1877 by the Euripides theater company the space in front of the proscenium arch was turned to a form of orchestra, where the thymele was also placed, so that the chorus would be separated from the protagonists.
We discovered in production that the thymele ("altar") traditionally located at the center point needs to be removed for this drama, and replaced by a prop altar at front center.
One is that the so-called thymele or central ritual altar of Dionysus might have been used.
The suggestion, then, is that Prometheus was bound in the central orchestra to the thymele or some alternative structure and that the action of the play took place in the orchestra around him.