tidal bore


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tidal bore

[′tīd·əl ′bȯr]
(design engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We witnessed the world's strongest and highest tides and experienced raging whirlpools and tidal bores in some of the most stunning locations on the planet.
Which British river is noted for its tidal bore, a wave that runs up-river at high tide?
As regards the forward equations, a lot of discontinuity capture methods are used to solve the shallow water equations, including the cases with strong discontinuity, such as tidal bore [15].
Whilst cyclone can produce powerful winds and torrential rains they also produce high waves (Tidal bore) and damaging storm surge as well as tornadoes.
The Kasanka bat migration in Zambia, Carlsbad Cavern in America, Lunar rainbow in Zambia and Shubenacadie tidal bore in Canada take the 16,17,18 and 19 spots.
The Moncton race will be staged at Tidal Bore Park.
Disasters are said to come in threes, but Bruce Parker makes it clear they've always come in waves, and frequently provoke ingenious responses: the fact that the first tide table was devised in China is down to the tidal bore in the Qiantang River--at more than three kilometres wide and seven metres high, it isn't surprising that local minds applied themselves to predicting its appearance.
Summary: Around 150,000 people have watched one of China's most unusual natural phenomena - the Qiantang river tidal bore.
Having just spent a few days visiting my father, who has lived by the Petitcodiac for ninety-two years and counting, it is fascinating to recount his youth when "you could hear the rush of the tidal bore as you fell asleep at night."
"A tidal bore is a wall of water that moves up certain rivers due to an incoming tide.
This careless remark opened the floodgates and it would have taken a master mariner to navigate the tidal bore that swept through the conversation.
It was, in fact, a photograph of a tidal bore on the Qiantangjiang River in China taken two years earlier.