tidal friction

tidal friction

Energy dissipated by the raising of tides. As with tidal heights, the total energy dissipated on the Earth by tidal friction depends on the topography of coastlines and on the areal extent of adjacent continental shelves. Tidal friction is currently slowing down the Earth's rotation rate (i.e. the length of the day) by 16 seconds every million years and is causing the Moon to recede from the Earth by about 3.7 meters per century at present. See also secular acceleration.

tidal friction

[′tīd·əl ′frik·shən]
(oceanography)
The frictional effect of the tidal wave particularly in shallow waters that lengthens the tidal epoch and tends to slow the rotational velocity of the earth, thus increasing very slowly the length of the day.
References in periodicals archive ?
It proposes that Enceladus has a highly porous core, allowing water from the ocean to easily permeate it, where tidal friction causes it to heat up.
Our galaxy could be full of isolated ecosystems inside icy moons and planets, many of which are kept liquid by radioactive isotopes, and tidal friction driven by nothing more than orbits and spins--truly the children of celestial mechanics.
There is a fundamental difficulty, well-known among specialists in the field for many years, in extrapolating the 38 mm/year current rate of lunar recession back in time, by the equations of tidal friction, to the early days of the Earth-Moon system--running the film backwards would have the Moon crash into the Earth only 1 .
Close-in planets seem to orbit their stars faster than the stars themselves rotate, so this tidal friction will have the opposite effect.
Further complicating simple resonance calculations is tidal friction, which is believed to subtract considerable energy from the system (Greenberg et al.
In fact, even today, considerable heating due to tidal friction would be expected by this constantly moving barycenter, giving rise to convection currents and in effect resolving the enigma of its application to the subduction phenomena that causes seafloor spreading and which pushes one continent under another.
The Earth is spinning, and because of the tidal friction of the moon on the Earth, it slows the spin down, so then the moon has to move away to compensate for that.
A possible solution to the dilemma arises from a process known as Kozai Cycles with Tidal Friction.
Scientists know the Earth's spin has slowed through time because of tidal friction - energy lost as the moon causes water to slosh around the globe.
A likely explanation is that another, unseen massive planet a little farther out from the star is in a gravitational resonance with HAT-P-2b and, like a kid pumping a swing, is pumping it into an elliptical orbit as fast as tidal friction can dissipate the added energy away.
Tidal friction and heating may have inflated the planet's atmosphere, causing much of it to escape and leaving behind a core that might be primarily iron and rock (S&T: May issue, page 26).