intertidal zone

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intertidal zone

[¦in·tər′tīd·əl ‚zōn]
(oceanography)
The part of the littoral zone above low-tide mark.
References in periodicals archive ?
As shown in Figure 4(a), the chloride profiles at the tidal zone show lower concentrations at the surface, accounting for 0.27-0.44% by cement which is about two times less than that for the submerged zone due to the diffusion into the sea water with lower concentration.
Hence, each species of fish was defined according to three criteria: a) substrate preference (rocky bottom, sandy bottom, and water); b) position in the water column (benthic, nectobenthic, and pelagic); c) tidal zones (rocky pools, intertidal, and non-tidal).
In the high tidal zone, the water content was approximately 34% to 35%, and the NaCl content was approximately 14 to 25 ppt.
Lucy Scholes from The Independent said: "Without doubt, she's one of the best British novelists writing today, and The Tidal Zone, which reads like the electric shock of a defibrillator, or the jolt of an EpiPen of adrenaline, confirms this."
Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine whether the average amount of ENT in beach sand varied significantly by tidal zones. Traditional ANOVA was used in the overall analysis that combined the data for all beaches because of the large sample size (225 measures = 15 measures times 12 beaches).
What gets more clouded are the various competing forms of property that often conflict in the tidal zone: private claims vs.
In the present study, sampling performed from Coasts with very low gradient, wide tidal zone with tidal pools and soft sediments in all parts.
The piles were scraped of barnacles and fouling in the tidal zone, usually 1 to 2 weeks prior to inspection.
With many offshore pipelines making landfall in tidal zones, the use of horizontal directional drilling (HDD) techniques continue to grow in popularity as a means to mitigate the potential environmental impact of such projects.
Studies by the Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute have shown that wastes accumulate in the soil first and then migrate incrementally to the tidal zone, the subtidal zone, and finally to deep seawaters and into sediments.
When they carbon-dated shells that lived in that old tidal zone, they determined that the shoreline was active about 17,500 years ago.