tidemark


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tidemark

1. a mark left by the highest or lowest point of a tide
2. a marker indicating the highest or lowest point reached by a tide
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tidemark

[′tīd‚märk]
(oceanography)
A high-water mark left by tidal water.
The highest point reached by a high tide.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The delamination typically occurs at the tidemark, with the calcified zone of cartilage remaining attached to the subchondral bone.
As a result, Tidemark embarked on a series of initiatives designed to accelerate the company's evolution and international expansion.
A slight decrease in intensity of staining with hematoxylin and eosin along the cartilage was also found in the tibia and talus, as well as disappearance and/or discontinuation of the tidemark. Large areas of flocculation and cracks in the deeper layers (Figure 2D) were observed at some points on the surface of the cartilage.
The mounting pressure for more products and global expansion, along with increased investor interest are but a few examples of why organizations need CFOs to play larger, more strategic roles in a company's planning and decision-making," says Christian Gheorghe, Founder & Chief Executive Officer, Tidemark.
Currently, she is the president of Tidemark Institute, a non-profit organization dedicated to research, project development, and scholarship in teaching, learning, and implementation of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and a visiting scholar at the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise.
Compared with the CON group (Figure 2), the ND1W, ND2W, ND4W, and ND8W groups showed poor cell profiles, loss of the parallel arrangement of the collagen fibers, and an unclear or undetectable tidemark (Figure 3A, B, C and D); the poor collagen fiber alignment and structural changes were also confirmed in the polarized images (Figure 3E, F, G and H).
Michaels, principal investigator of the NSF grant, is working with Jean Moon, founder and principal of the Tidemark Institute and visiting scholar at Clark's Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise and Professor Brian Reiser of the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University.
Furthermore, in areas of chronic detachment, a pigment line (often referred to as a "tidemark") may form at the boundary of the detached retina.
It will enter the final phase of construction to reach the 634-meter tidemark. After the tower reaches 634 meters, construction work for a commercial complex in its base and a passageway connecting to the nearest station will start.
As these get smaller they are difficult to control, and it is particularly hard to achieve a soft edge to a vignetted effect, often resulting in a 'tidemark'.
10) Do one's ears and neck, to prevent potatoes*/ tidemark. 11) Cup one's hands in water.
Even the ominous two-foot-thick black tidemark found in the stratigraphy of the western slopes of the Byrsa, the archaeological record of the razing of the city in 146 BC, is packed full of southern Italian tableware, telling us what pottery styles were in vogue in Carthage at that time.