tidewater glacier

tidewater glacier

[′tīd‚wȯd·ər ′glā·shər]
(hydrology)
A glacier that descends into the sea and usually has a terminal ice cliff. Also known as tidal glacier.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Researchers have developed a new method to allow for the first direct measurement of the submarine melt rate of a tidewater glacier, and, in doing so, they concluded that current theoretical models may be underestimating glacial melt by up to two orders of magnitude.
Scientists have developed a method to directly measure the submarine melt rate of a tidewater glacier.
Scientists have developed a multi-beam sonar method to directly measure the submarine melt rate of a tidewater glacier. Their results suggest current theoretical models may be massively underestimating glacial melt.
Factors affecting haul-out behavior of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) in tidewater glacier inlets in Alaska: can tourism vessels and seals coexist?
Tidewater glacier fluctuations in central East Greenland coastal and fjord regions (1980s-2005).
No photograph or high-definition television picture can truly represent the majestic beauty of a tidewater glacier as it flows into the sea.
No photograph can truly represent the majestic beauty of a tidewater glacier as it flows into the sea.
The UB team studied the rates of retreat of the prehistoric tidewater glacier, of similar size and geometry to contemporary ones, as way to get a longer-term view of how fast these glaciers can literally disappear.
Although the effects of climate change can now be observed almost anywhere in the United States, nowhere are the effects more prominent than in Alaska, where unprecedented rates of sea ice loss, tidewater glacier recession, coastal erosion, permafrost degradation, and other landscape changes presage major changes to Alaska wildlife populations.
So the disingegration of Columbia, the last of Alaska's 52 tidewater glacier, is clearly under way.
The face of a tidewater glacier visible from a boat is only part of it -- much of the glacier's leading edge is underwater in a deep fjord.
That uncertainty prompted Briner and his team to study the rates of retreat of a prehistoric tidewater glacier of similar size and geometry to contemporary ones, as a way to get a longer-term view of how fast these glaciers literally can disappear.

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