tie

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tie

1. a structural member carrying tension, such as a tie beam or tie rod
2. the US and Canadian name for sleeper (on a railway track)
3. Music a slur connecting two notes of the same pitch indicating that the sound is to be prolonged for their joint time value
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tie

 

a support for rails in the form of a beam laid on top of the ballast layer of the roadbed. Ties ensure that the positions of the two rails do not change with respect to each other. They accept pressure from the rails and transmit it to the ballast layer. In the USSR ties are made of reinforced concrete (270 cm long) or wood (primarily softwoods) impregnated with antiseptics (275, 280, and 300 cm long); some foreign ties are made of metal. One kilometer of railroad track requires 1,600,1,840, or 2,000 ties.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

tie

[]
(civil engineering)
One of the transverse supports to which railroad rails are fastened to keep them to line, gage, and grade.
(electricity)
Electrical connection or strap.
(engineering)
A beam, post, rod, or angle to hold two pieces together; a tension member in a construction.
(mining engineering)
A support for the roof in coal mines.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tie

masonry ties, 1
metal ties, 1
1. Any unit of material which connects two parts, as masonry to masonry. Also see wall tie.
2. A framing member which sustains only a tensile load; a member in tension to prevent spreading.
3. In surveying, a connection from a point of known position to a point whose position is desired.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its atmosphere Is now one of faded elegance, and the lobby is filled with tieless men wearing double-knit trousers.") [Hereinafter Schlesingers Journals], The punctuation in Jr.,'s looks strange, with back-to-back-to-back punctuation marks, but, as far as The New Yorker is concerned, it's right.
Shortly thereafter I put my ties away, and just went tieless. I still hate to wear a tie, and so does everyone else in the family." Bill is perhaps best known as the visionary who fought to bring the recyclable aluminum can to the U.S.
and he is tieless in a blue V-neck sweater and khaki pants.
But fleshy Henry is like a floppy-haired younger Falstaff, buttoned into a tieless three-piece suit.
Prince Charles is photographed with the Spice Girls, is seen tieless with his arms around his boys, turns up in Swaziland to acknowledge the need for change, and has never been so popular.
(4.) Eisgruber and Sager illustrate this point by comparing the case of an Army officer refused permission to wear a yarmulke, as his religion requires, because of the Army's interest in uniform appearance with the case of another Army officer refused permission to go tieless, as a skin disorder requires, because of the same interest in uniform appearance.
It was very successful," says Tom DeWolf, tieless with Steve Stenkamp, Bob Woodward and John Wujack, who later ran for the county commission and lost.
We'd like to assure the NCAA that the Lord intended football to be tieless. Look at the kind of necks He bestowed upon the players!
Dylan in a shiny gray suit, tieless, his white shirt buttoned to his strangely-bearded chin, resembled a Yeshiva student as he stood talking to one of his back-up group that, for lack of a name, we simply called The Band.
The most visible and by far the boldest success of the regime lies in the public enforcement of an Islamic dress code (veiled, ghost-like women, and tieless, unshaven men), the closing of bars and casinos, and separation of the sexes in public gatherings (including classrooms).
Clearly, these people--"the men tieless," the "women bejeaned" -- are not those with whom Lipman would care to share the concert hall.
The introduction of tieless complexes is an unexpected change in Bergmann's ontological development because he earlier took the tie to be the key to complexity.