tiger beetle

(redirected from tiger beetles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

tiger beetle

[′tī·gər ‚bēd·əl]
(invertebrate zoology)
The common name for any of the bright-colored beetles in the family Cicindelidae; there are about 1300 species distributed all over the world.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cobblestone tiger beetles are ideal candidates to aid in monitoring overall riparian health along the upper Genesee River, and the use of bioindicator species can be helpful in reducing the amount of time and cost required for inventory (Carroll and Pearson, 1998).
The primary threat to the Ohlone tiger beetle is habitat destruction and fragmentation caused by urban development.
But since tiger beetles tend to remain near the habitat in which they spend their 22-month larval cycle, displaced adults, such as those used in the Cape Cod experiment, often fly away from ideal habitat simply because of unfamiliar surroundings.
Tiger beetles often attempt mating with either males or females of different species, and interespecific hybridization occurs (Pearson 1988).
Several insect species here are found nowhere else in the world, such as the Great Sand Dunes tiger beetle and a type of darkling beetle.
The Florida Scrub Tiger Beetle Cicindela scabrosa Schaupp, a species precinctive to Florida, has not previously been recorded from Hardee County, Florida.
In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), less than a dozen species and subspecies of tiger beetles have been noted (Wiesner, 1993; Gillett, 1995; Wiesner, 1996; Cassola and Schneider, 1997), but not all known species have yet been formally recorded (Howarth, B., pers.
Other locally published records that are firsts for the UAE have, however, quietly been ignored and attributed to others as for the tiger beetles Megacephala (Grammognatha) euphratica and Lophyro histrio (Gillett, 1995, not Weisner, 1996).
Diary of a Citizen Scientist: Chasing Tiger Beetles and Other New Ways of Engaging the World
Cornell University researchers have discovered that, unlike insects that wave their "feelers" around to acquire information, tiger beetles rigidly hold their antennae directly in front of them to mechanically sense their environments and avoid obstacles while running, according to a study published online in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.