tight knot

tight knot

[¦tīt ¦nät]
(materials)

sound knot, tight knot

An undecayed, solid, dead knot at least as hard as the surrounding wood, and firmly held in place.
References in classic literature ?
Wait a bit, I'll arrange a flag as well,' he added, picking up the kerchief which he had thrown down in the sledge after taking it from round his collar, and drawing off his gloves and standing up on the front of the sledge and stretching himself to reach the strap, he tied the handkerchief to it with a tight knot.
I had the time to see her dull face, red, not with a mantling blush, but as if her flat cheeks had been vigorously slapped, and to take in the squat figure, the scanty, dusty brown hair drawn into a tight knot at the back of the head.
The noise went away up the lane with the men, who staggered together in a tight knot, remonstrating with one another foolishly.
Somewhere in his mind, a tight knot seemed to have loosened.
But his mouth was full of soot and cob- webs, and he was tied up in such very tight knots, he could not make anybody hear him.
Yes, I am,' rejoined Miss Squeers, tying tight knots in her pocket- handkerchief and clenching her teeth.
I do this by tying opposite corners in a tight knot around the handle then repeating with the other two.
In contrast, Tom, Karin, and Livia are a tight knot in the center of it all.
I missed that whole tight knot of people--the focus puller, the operator and so on--the group of people who are around the camera and indeed the kind of dark proscenium of the movie camera somewhere on the set.
Love, hate, illusion and fact play havoc in us to a point that we confuse all emotions and tie them in a tight knot.
This series of scratches and that tight knot are the deeds of capitalists -- they play both ends against the middle