time of delivery


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time of delivery

[′tīm əv di′liv·ə·rē]
(communications)
The time at which the addressee or responsible relay agency receipts for a message.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Response: Settlement of the Dispute When the Price Is Not Attended at the Time of Delivery
Key to practicing preventive obstetrics is the understanding that there is no single optimal time of delivery in term pregnancy, he said.
We have recently seen three infants born at the District of Columbia General Hospital whose mothers were seronegative for syphilis at the time of delivery (Table 1).
Women and their partners are asked to join a think-tank, telling staff what worked well for them at their time of delivery and what they thought could be improved.
Controlling for the effects of birth outcomes (as indicated by Apgar scores, neonatal risk measures and mother's psychological distress at the time of delivery) had no effect on the overall relationship between cocaine exposure and child mental development.
Section 811 requires, among other things, that the secretary of defense conduct market research before purchasing a product listed in the Federal Prison Industries (FPI) catalog, to ensure that the FPI product is comparable in price, quality, and time of delivery to products available in the private sector.
With the new system cargo agents use hand-held PCs with a bar code scanner to enter data into the computer system, to enable Sabena to trace cargo from time of shipment to time of delivery.
"We have the time of delivery and tray pass down to eight to twelve minutes as a result of this team approach," noted Schultz.
Now, in the largest study of mother-to-child HIV transmission to date, Philippe Van de Perre at the AIDS Reference Laboratory in Kigali, Rwanda, demonstrates that women who test negative for the AIDS virus at the time of delivery, but who become infected, can later pass the virus on to their infants, probably via breast feeding.
More recent work, however, taking into account the effects of widespread zidovudine use for the prevention of perinatal transmission, suggests that if the woman's viral load is below 1,000 copies of RNA per mL at the time of delivery there is no difference in risk of transmission between elective cesarean section and vaginal delivery, Dr.
"It may not be so much a function of the cesarean section that prolongs the survival of these kids through the first day as it is the availability of resuscitation teams at the time of delivery," he says.