time-division multiple access

time-division multiple access

[¦tīm də‚vizh·ən ‚məl·tə·pəl ′ak‚ses]
(communications)
A technique that allows multiple users who are geographically dispersed to gain access to a communications channel, by permitting each user access to the full pass-band of the channel for a limited time, after which the access right is assigned to another user. Abbreviated TDMA.
References in periodicals archive ?
8,116,284 and 6,591,111, which relate to Motorola Solutions' time-division multiple access (TDMA) and group radio communication system technology, respectively, the company said.
8,116,284 and 6,591,111, which relate to Motorola Solutions' time-division multiple access and group radio communication system technology, respectively.
The claims at issue relate to time-division multiple access ("TDMA") technology that allows multiple parties to communicate at the same time in a discrete timeslot, using a mutually exclusive synchronization pattern on equipment for sending and receiving messages.
"Furthermore, its Time-Division Multiple Access (TDMA) digital technology provides additional benefits such as lower infrastructure costs, longer battery life and advanced voice and data features, which is why TDMA is the digital technology choice of the future."
Also, the BCM3142 QAMLink 12-channel universal advanced time-division multiple access (A-TDMA) and synchronous code division multiple access (S-CDMA) physical layer (PHY) receiver, which was selected by Cisco Systems for their next generation DOCSIS 3.0-based CMTS equipment.
The Network-Centric Waveform provides OTM and ATH satellite communications between users in a full-mesh multi-frequency time-division multiple access network.
These operate in the VHF/ UHF band and work on the principle of self-organizing time-division multiple access. Simple back-of-the-envelope calculation indicates that an AIS receiver fitted on a low-Earth-orbit satellite can provide tactical-level information on a near-real-time basis.
Unlike other competing technologies, such as GSM (global system for mobile communication) or TDMA (time-division multiple access), CDMA has no hard limit on the number of users who may share one base station, leading it to become the fastest growing wireless technology.
(The upstream limitation has more to do with the battery power required to deliver more bits per symbol as the data rates go up.) flash-OFDM can be likened to putting time-division multiple access on top of OFDM, yielding all the benefits of both technologies in terms of robustness under mobility and channel-delay spreads, interference averaging from other cells, and orthogonality inside the cell.
The dramatic increase in cellular traffic has necessitated the use of spread spectrum techniques such as time-division multiple access (TDMA) and code-division multiple access (CDMA).
Significant advancements to the existing multi-frequency time-division multiple access (MF-TDMA) waveform greatly improves the availability of ultra-small disadvantaged terminals, thus improving reliability particularly for Communications-on-the Move (COTM) networks.
These exercises also served to validate the LOS University by actually incorporating the LOS V1s with the Time-Division Multiple Access links from the CPN to the JNN.

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