time-geography

time-geography

an approach within GEOGRAPHY which focuses on the way in which social events are structured, ‘through time and across geographical space’ (Hepple, 1985). Pioneered by geographers such as Hagerstrand (1975), the general ideas involved in this approach have been recently introduced into sociological thinking by GIDDENS (see also TIME-SPACE DISTANCIATION).
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
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Following the separation of time and space in social scientific thought (Bergson, 2001 [1913]), the (re)introduction of a temporal dimension into human geography has been attributed to Hagerstrand (1970), whose formulation of time-geography sought to link macrolevel and microlevel spatial analyses of human behaviour.
He describes Internet connectivity through mobile devices and the 1G to 4G transition; theories and models associated with new technology adoption; whether the scope of cloud computing can be extended to the concept of mobile marketing; a framework based on the relationship between cloud-based marketing, 4Ps, and the consumer decision making process; the benefit of ubiquity from the perspective of time-geography, psychology, and marketing; challenges to multichannel marketing tools and key technologies in coding and wireless data exchange; tools and trends in advertising and promotion; location-based services in terms of the tourism and health industries, as well as the issue of privacy; and mobile payment tools and issues related to virus and malware protection.
They cover modeling concepts used in spatial analysis, geographical scales and multidimensional statistical methods, the location of public services from theory to application, time-geography (defined as individuals in space and time), the process of spatial diffusion and modeling change, spatial micro-simulation models, multi-agent simulations of spatial dynamics, remote sensing and urban modeling, mathematical formalization for spatial interactions, and the subtleties of fractals and geography.
If you are looking for a treatment of time-geography, this isn't the book.
Teather argues that the collection brings power to the border crossing of disciplines in some distinct ways: for example, `learning new socio-spatial patterns that involve time-geography, social positioning, activity spaces and social networks'; and focussing on `place and identity [as] ...

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