timeout


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timeout

[′tīm‚au̇t]
(control systems)
A test of the reliability of robotic software in which the robot is halted if a portion of software does not function properly until the problem is corrected.

timeout

A period of time after which an error condition is raised if some event has not occured. A common example is sending a message. If the receiver does not acknowledge the message within some preset timeout period, a transmission error is assumed to have occured.

timeout

In communications, the intentional ending of an incomplete task. If an acknowledgment, carrier, logon, etc., has not occurred in a specified amount of time, the timeout ends the waiting loop so that the request can be retransmitted or the process terminated. Timeouts are common in communications applications in order to free up a line or port that is tied up with a request that has not been answered in a reasonable amount of time. For each type of situation, there is a default length of time before the timeout is initiated, which typically can be adjusted by the user or network administrator. See tickle packet.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are some techniques available to DBAs to minimize lock timeouts.
Both Sharapova and Ivanovic are through the first round of the Open, and the statements that the Russian has made about penalizing medical timeouts have reached Ivanovic.
There was one instance of a timeout taken before a serving succession was started and this was not included in the analyses.
Time expired before Russell Wilson could spike the ball in Oregon's 45-38 victory over the Badgers in the Rose Bowl on Monday night, but the Wisconsin quarterback would not have had to worry about the clock if the Badgers had not used a couple of timeouts early in the second half.
In the operating room, a standard TIMEOUT is conducted wherein the circulating nurse clearly verbalizes that a right ring finger extensor tendon repair is to be performed.
The timeout ribbon procedure controls for some of the negative side effects of timeout, but also raises additional concerns.
If you're USC and they call timeout, it's like, 'OK, you want to keep playing, let's play.
from the classroom and putting him in timeout might have gone so far as to deprive him of a protected interest in a public education, but the circuit judges, unlike the district court, concluded that 21 timeouts totaling approximately 12 hours over two and a half months did not go that far.
Since the procedure was first discussed in literature nearly a half century ago (Baer, 1961), timeout has been incorporated into countless classroom teachers' behavior management plans for students.
In addition, more participants from the 10-s and 20-s timeout groups exhibited learning on this task earlier in the session than in the other time-out groups and all three time-out groups had more participants who learned the task compared with the 0-s time-out group by the end of the session.
Timeout (see below) might not work because of a lack of praise and other reinforcers in the child's time-in setting.