tit


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tit

1. any of numerous small active Old World songbirds of the family Paridae (titmice), esp those of the genus Parus (bluetit, great tit, etc.). They have a short bill and feed on insects and seeds
2. any of various similar small birds
3. Archaic or dialect a worthless or worn-out horse; nag
References in classic literature ?
He felt as he swung his scythe that he was at the very end of his strength, and was making up his mind to ask Tit to stop.
And this long row seemed particularly hard work to Levin; but when the end was reached and Tit, shouldering his scythe, began with deliberate stride returning on the tracks left by his heels in the cut grass, and Levin walked back in the same way over the space he had cut, in spite of the sweat that ran in streams over his face and fell in drops down his nose, and drenched his back as though he had been soaked in water, he felt very happy.
"I will swing less with my arm and more with my whole body," he thought, comparing Tit's row, which looked as if it had been cut with a line, with his own unevenly and irregularly lying grass.
The first row, as Levin noticed, Tit had mowed specially quickly, probably wishing to put his master to the test, and the row happened to be a long one.
He heard nothing but the swish of scythes, and saw before him Tit's upright figure mowing away, the crescent-shaped curve of the cut grass, the grass and flower heads slowly and rhythmically falling before the blade of his scythe, and ahead of him the end of the row, where would come the rest.
Levin gave his scythe to Tit, and together with the peasants, who were crossing the long stretch of mown grass, slightly sprinkled with rain, to get their bread from the heap of coats, he went towards his house.
In the midst of his toil there were moments during which he forgot what he was doing, and it came all easy to him, and at those same moments his row was almost as smooth and well cut as Tit's.
On finishing yet another row he would have gone back to the top of the meadow again to begin the next, but Tit stopped, and going up to the old man said something in a low voice to him.
In two winters, Willow Tit mortality peaked in early winter, whereas the survival probability was quite constant at other times.
Game theorists know that sometimes tit for tat does OK, sometimes not; it all depends upon the specifics of the situation.
The only exception to this rule seems to be the long-tailed tit, which sadly I never seem to be able to attract to my bird-table.
Blackbirds were present in the most gardens (90%), followed by robins (71%), blue tit (74%) and woodpigeon 71%).