go

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go

or

i-go,

a board game popular in Japan that probably originated in China or India as long ago as the third millennium B.C. The board is marked by a grid of 19 horizontal and 19 vertical lines to form 361 intersections. Of the 361 pieces, 181 are black stones and 180 are white. The player with the black stones begins by placing a stone on any intersection. The players alternate turns. The object for each player is to control the most territory on the board while capturing as many of the opposing player's stones as possible. Stones are captured and removed from the board when they are completely encircled and are deprived of any access, either directly or through a chain of like stones, to a free space. A game is over when all the empty spaces on the board either are controlled by one or the other player or cannot be controlled by either player. The winner is the player who controls the most open spaces after the stones captured by the opposing player have been substracted. The complexity of go has made it, like chess, a subject for artificial intelligenceartificial intelligence
(AI), the use of computers to model the behavioral aspects of human reasoning and learning. Research in AI is concentrated in some half-dozen areas.
..... Click the link for more information.
 research, but it was regarded as a more difficult challenge than chess. In 2016–17, however, versions of Google's DeepMind AlphaGo defeated top go players.

Bibliography

See E. Lasker, Go and Go-Moku (rev. ed. 1960).

go

, I-go
a game for two players in which stones are placed on a board marked with a grid, the object being to capture territory on the board

Go

(games, application)
A thinking game with an oriental origin estimated to be around 4000 years old. Nowadays, the game is played by millions of people in (most notably) China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. In the Western world the game is practised by a yearly increasing number of players. On the Internet Go players meet, play and talk 24 hours/day on the Internet Go Server (IGS).

http://cwi.nl/~jansteen/go/go.html.

Usenet newsgroup: news:rec.games.go.

go

(1) An on-screen button that is clicked in order to activate a function such as search.

(2) (Go) An open source object-oriented programming language from Google. Styled after C/C++, Go was developed in 2007 to solve Google's own problems orchestrating huge datacenters. It was released to the public in 2012.

(3) A command used on a BBS or online service to switch the user to a particular forum or section. For example, typing go macintosh would switch you to a section specializing in Macintosh computers. Like any command language, you have to know what words to enter.
References in classic literature ?
He smiled then, and was kinder, but it was very sad, and I cried with them till he turned round all of a sudden, and told me to go home and take belladonna right away, or I'd have the fever."
"That's the very reason you ought to go away at once, so that you may escape it.
Meg and Jo came running down to behold the miracle which had been wrought, and Amy, feeling very precious and self-sacrificing, promised to go, if the doctor said Beth was going to be ill.
Philip got himself something to eat in a restaurant near Charing Cross; he had made up his mind to go to a play, and afterwards he fought his way into the pit of a theatre at which one of Oscar Wilde's pieces was being performed.
Adam then went straight to the house from which the Stonition coach started: Stoniton was the most obvious place for Hetty to go to first, whatever might be her destination, for she would hardly venture on any but the chief coach-roads.
No, she was not to be traced any farther; and the next hard task for Adam was to go home and carry the wretched tidings to the Hall Farm.
By and by we talked about what we better do, and found there warn't no way but just to go along down with the raft till we got a chance to buy a canoe to go back in.
I dived -- and I aimed to find the bottom, too, for a thirty-foot wheel had got to go over me, and I wanted it to have plenty of room.
I offered to go along with two men and a woman, that made it their business to get into houses by stratagem, and with them I was willing enough to venture.
I observed the biggest had a fine gold watch on, and a good necklace of pearl, and they had a footman in livery with them; but as it is not usual for the footman to go behind the ladies in the Mall, so I observed the footman stopped at their going into the Mall, and the biggest of the sisters spoke to him, which I perceived was to bid him be just there when they came back.
There was the Gladstone and the small hand-bag, and the two hampers, and a large roll of rugs, and some four or five overcoats and macintoshes, and a few umbrellas, and then there was a melon by itself in a bag, because it was too bulky to go in anywhere, and a couple of pounds of grapes in another bag, and a Japanese paper umbrella, and a frying pan, which, being too long to pack, we had wrapped round with brown paper.
"Well, I don't know, gents," replied the noble fellow, "but I suppose SOME train's got to go to Kingston; and I'll do it.