tokonoma


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tokonoma

In the Japanese house, an alcove, raised above the floor, for displaying a hanging scroll and a flower arrangement.
References in periodicals archive ?
And in one corner is a tokonoma, an alcove where a flower arrangement or a hanging scroll is meant to be placed.
He based the niche on the Japanese alcove known as a tokonoma.
Muy bien podria hacer lo contrario y optar por perderse en un doblez de la realidad, en un hueco, en un Hoyo Negro en miniatura, el Tokonoma que atisbo alguna vez Lezama Lima, lo que llaman en nuestros pueblos y en buen espanol, las ausencias: esos estados de distraccion y quietud --extasis portatiles-- cuando nos olvidamos de que existimos.
el mundo, el tokonoma, imagen del vacio y de la plenitud, oscila entre
Traditionally, Japanese designs are placed in what is called the tokonoma, an alcove in a home in which a flower arrangement, a hanging scroll, and other art is displayed (see Figure 16-7).
Ya tengo el tokonoma, el vacio,/ la compania insuperable,/ la conversacion en una esquina de Alejandria".
Fujimori has not only guided the making of it to an extreme degree, but has, in fact, built parts of it with his own hands, the most prominent of his pieces is certainly the set of shelves in the main room, which act as a tokonoma and are always graced with a vase.
The rest of the room was overshadowed by a yard-wide, floor-to-ceiling golden object I assumed was some sort of religious shrine - but later learned was a tokonoma, a stylized metal sculpture of an armored shogun, a centuries-old Japanese warrior.
Calligraphy of a Poem is mounted as a hanging scroll and may have been placed in the tokonoma (toe' koe no ma), a special alcove in a house set aside for the display of hanging scrolls and other art objects.
IMAGENES EN EL CIELO: CONSTELACIONES BIOGRAFEMATICAS Y UN BRILLANTE TOKONOMA
A selection of works featured in the publication are on show, not least a horizontal poem-letter, mounted as if for tea ceremony display in a tokonoma (ceremonial alcove), by Fu Shah (1607-84), one of the great early Qing calligraphers and the intellectual and literati hero of the Shanxi province.
The Okimono is a larger ornamental carving, made for the tokonoma, the decorative alcove which is considered one of the four essential elements in the main hall of a noble Japanese residence.