tomography

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tomography

[tə′mäg·rə·fē]
(electronics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tomography

 

(also body section roentgenography or sectional radiography), a technique of roentgenological study that is used to produce a photograph of a layer lying at a specific depth in the object under study.

Ordinary roentgenography results in the production on film of an overall image, from which it is not always possible to determine the true shape and size of a formation or the depth at which it lies. The production of a roentgenogram of a single layer is based on the movement of two of the three components (the X-ray tube, the X-ray film, and the object of study). In the most common technique, the patient is motionless, and the X-ray tube and film magazine move around him in opposite directions. The use of tomography makes possible the study of the trachea, the bronchi, and the blood vessels and the detection of infiltrates and cavities of the lungs, calculi in the kidney, gallbladder, and bile ducts, and tumors in the adrenals and urinary system. The combined use of X-ray contrast media and tomography (sectional bronchography, urography, and so on) is highly effective.

REFERENCE

Gladysz, B. Tomografiia v klinicheskoi praktike. Warsaw, 1965. (Translated from Polish.)

E. A. GRIGORIAN

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

tomography

An X-ray technique that shows a single plane (slice) of the object under examination, typically a part of the human body. See CAT scan.
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References in periodicals archive ?
By time-averaging the temporally resolved KL images over the quasi-steady period and subsequently ensemble averaging data from repeated experiments, an axisymmetric map of the KL field is obtained, which can be tomographically reconstructed to yield K, and subsequently [f.sub.v], using the inverse Radon transform mentioned above or the simpler inverse Abel transform.
The measurements for each femur were recorded as the "tomographically anticipated ideal femoral size" (TAIFS) (Fig.
Tomographically, the condition manifests as a mass that has invaded adjacent soft tissues but has left cortical bone intact.