tongue-tie


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tongue-tie

a congenital condition in which the tongue has restricted mobility as the result of an abnormally short frenulum
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In some cases, movement restrictions caused by tongue-tie and lip tether can result in difficulty with breastfeeding.
Midwife-led tongue-tie release - frenulotomy - has been available at The Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (Sath) for three years and the 1,000th procedure was carried out this week.
Breastfeeding improvement following tongue-tie and lip-tie release: a prospective cohort study.
Breast feeding difficulties which have been reported in literature as the earliest problem associated with the tongue-tie, was not seen as the main concern of parents in the subject study.
Association of Tongue-tie Practitioners and Tongue-tie UK Clapham, Beddford, England
About 4% of babies are born with tongue-tie (or ankyloglossia), an anatomic variation in the frenulum that restricts the tongue's movement.
Tongue-tie a-ects about 12 per cent of newborns and can sometimes make it hard for the baby to attach properly to their mother's breast.
One of the most common conditions resulting in poor latching on is tongue-tie. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tongue-tie with subsequent breastfeeding difficulties and other factors affecting the success of breastfeeding in newborn infants.
Little Thomas, 15 months, was recently identified as having tongue-tie, which occurs when the flap of skin joining the tongue to the base of the mouth is too short and restricts movement.
With the resurgence of breastfeeding, anatomical factors such as tongue-ties and fraenum/lip-ties need to be carefully considered as primary factors in creating breastfeeding difficulties [Coryllos et al., 2004] and many of today's practicing physicians were taught that treatment of tongue-tie, (ankyloglossia) is an outdated concept, a relic of times past and during the last several decades of predominant bottle-feeding, ankyloglossia was relegated to the status of a 'non-problem' because of the lack of significant impact upon bottle feeding behaviours.
Decades ago, it was routine for midwives to quickly cut the tongue with a nail if they noticed it was tied after birth, but stricter health and safety rules eradicated that practice even though as many as one in ten babies may be born with tongue-tie.
Tongue-tie, or ankyloglossia, refers to a tongue that is attached too tightly to the floor of the mouth due to a short or tight frenulum (the thin membrane that attaches the tongue to the floor of the mouth).