contraction

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contraction,

in physics: see expansionexpansion,
in physics, increase in volume resulting from an increase in temperature. Contraction is the reverse process. When heat is applied to a body, the rate of vibration and the distances between the molecules composing it are increased and, hence, the space occupied by the
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.

contraction,

in writing: see abbreviationabbreviation,
in writing, arbitrary shortening of a word, usually by cutting off letters from the end, as in U.S. and Gen. (General). Contraction serves the same purpose but is understood strictly to be the shortening of a word by cutting out letters in the middle, the omission
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.
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contraction

[kən′trak·shən]
(graphic arts)
A microfilm defect in the form of a compressed image that occurs when the film speed is reduced as the document passes through a rotary microfilmer.
(mathematics)
A function f from a metric space to itself for which there is a constant K that is less than 1 such that, for any two elements in the space, a and b, the distance between f (a) and f (b) is less than K times the distance between a and b.
(mechanics)
The action or process of becoming smaller or pressed together, as a gas on cooling.
(physiology)
Shortening of the fibers of muscle tissue.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

contraction

Of concrete, the sum of volume changes occurring as the result of all processes affecting the bulk volume of a mass of concrete.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

contraction

1. Physiol any normal shortening or tensing of an organ or part, esp of a muscle, e.g. during childbirth
2. Pathol any abnormal tightening or shrinking of an organ or part
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

contraction

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References in periodicals archive ?
The results of neurogenic tonic contractions stimulated by EFS at frequencies from 1 to 64 Hz were shown in Supplemental Fig.
Phasic contractions are apparent as rapid peaks, whereas tonic contractions cause gradual changes in force that can be maintained for prolonged periods.
KCl (60 mM) induced reproducible tonic contractions of the ileum (0.37 [+ or -] 0.05 g, n = 15).
In the prostatic portion of vas deferens, the phasic contraction induced by norepinephrine results from the release of intracellular [Ca.sup.2+] stores, and the tonic contraction results from extracellular [Ca.sup.2+] influx (Burt et al., 1998; Vesperinas et al., 1989).
It included parameters related to endurance during an escape response (total number of phasics, time to fatigue, number of phasics before fatigue, mean duration of tonic contractions, number of tonic contractions >5 sec).
Initially, endothelium-denuded aortic rings were challenged with ANG II or PHE in [Ca.sup.2+]-free KBS to obtain transient contractions (which are attributed to IP3-mediated [Ca.sup.2+] release from intracellular stores), and then [Ca.sup.2+] was added (in the absence of agonists) to induce tonic contractions through store-operated channels (SOCs), which are activated by the emptying of intracellular [Ca.sup.2+] stores (6-11).
Because she had a short period of unconsciousness without feces or urine incontinence, tonic contractions or constitutional symptoms, electroencephalogram and head-up tilt testing was normal, neurological seizure and vasovagal syncope were excluded.
On the other hand, the tonic contractions induced by 1 [micro]M carbachol did not exhibit any significant change between control and CYP-injected rats (Table 1).