seizure

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seizure

Pathol a sudden manifestation or recurrence of a disease, such as an epileptic convulsion
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Seizure

 

a pathological neuropsychic state that arises in an abrupt fitlike manner. Seizures frequently take the form of convulsions or other involuntary movements accompanied by clouding of consciousness. This stage is later replaced by a deep pathological sleep or stupor. Epilepsy, hysteria, and diseases of the brain can produce seizures. Seizures may occur in the form of a sudden relaxation of muscle tone (cataplectic seizure) or a sudden falling asleep (narcoleptic seizure). The term “seizure” is also used in the broader sense of paroxysm.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

seizure

[′sē·zhər]
(medicine)
The sudden onset or recurrence of a disease or an attack.
Specifically, an epileptic attack, fit, or convulsion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were no significant differences in latencies to the onset of myoclonic and clonic seizures and the percentage of the animals showing tonic seizure and death between the water and olive oil groups.
The aqueous extract of inflorescences significantly delayed only the presence of tonic seizures at doses of 300 mg/kg (19.89 [+ or -] 4.54 min) and 600 mg/kg (27.51 [+ or -] 2.49 min) (Figure 2(c)).
This phase lasted for about 1-2 minutes, was regarded as a tonic seizures. Then, suddenly mouse suffered from successive involuntary high frequency vibration that was clearly visible at this stage, especially when compared with mice that had received the carrier.
nobilis nt nt Data represent percentage of tonic seizures and mortality (n=10) * -P <0.001 for phenytoin and ethosuximide compared to saline, and for L.
Tonic seizures were observed in 17% of people with MS in a Japanese study in 1974.[34] Since that time, painful tonic seizures have been well described.
In spite of the fact that in routine clinical practice, focal seizures may well be observed in generalized seizures and secondary generalized seizures are not infrequent in focal epilepsies (as the occurrence of automatisms or bilateral asymmetrical tonic seizures in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy [JME]), the elimination of generalized/focal distinction, not for the epileptic seizures but for the epilepsies, has been widely criticized by several authors on the grounds that no sufficient scientific evidence was existent for such a radical change (11,12,13,14,15,16,17).
One type, generalized seizures, includes generalized tonic-clonic seizures (formerly called "grand mal" seizures), tonic seizures, atonic seizures, or absence seizures (formerly called "petit mal" seizures).
In this study, Primphos cause clonic and tonic seizures, and ultimately death.
leonurus extract in the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg respectively protected 37.5% and 50% of animals used and significantly (p <0.05; Student's t-test) delayed pentylenetetrazole (90 mg/kg)-induced tonic seizures. Similarly, the same doses of L.
In summary, this study showed that verapamil (voltage-dependent calcium channel antagonist type L) decreased clonic and tonic seizures from Primphos in mice is probably the main mechanism anticonvulsant related to block calcium channels and reduce calcium flow within neurons.