tooth

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tooth:

see teethteeth,
hard, calcified structures embedded in the bone of the jaws of vertebrates that perform the primary function of mastication. Humans and most other mammals have a temporary set of teeth, the deciduous, or milk, teeth; in humans, they usually erupt between the 6th and 24th
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Tooth

One of the structures found in the mouth of most vertebrates which, in their most primitive form, were conical and were usually used for seizing, cutting up, or chewing food, or for all three of these purposes. The basic tissues that make up the vertebrate tooth are enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp (see illustration).

Structure of a toothenlarge picture
Structure of a tooth

Enamel is the hardest tissue in the body because of the very high concentration, about 96%, of mineral salts. The remaining 4% is water and organic matter. The enamel has no nerve supply, although it is nourished to a very slight degree from the dentin it surrounds. The fine, microscopic hexagonal rods (prisms) of apatite which make up the enamel are held together by a cementing substance.

Dentin, a very bonelike tissue, makes up the bulk of a tooth, consisting of 70% of such inorganic material as calcium and phosphorus, and 30% of water and organic matter, principally collagen. The rich nerve supply makes dentin a highly sensitive tissue; this sensitivity serves no obvious physiological function.

Cement is a calcified tissue, a type of modified bone less hard than dentin, which fastens the roots of teeth to the alveolus, the bony socket into which the tooth is implanted. A miscellaneous tissue, consisting of nerves, fibrous tissue, lymph, and blood vessels, known as the pulp, occupies the cavity of the tooth surrounded by dentin.

The dentition of therian mammals, at least primitively, consists of four different kinds of teeth. The incisors (I) are usually used for nipping and grasping; the canines (C) serve for stabbing or piercing; the premolars (Pm) grasp, slice, or function as additional molars; and the molars (M) do the chewing, cutting, and grinding of the food. Primitively the placentals have 40 teeth and the marsupials 50.

In therian mammals, probably because of the intricacies and vital importance of tooth occlusion, only part of the first (or “milk”) dentition is replaced. This second, or permanent, dentition is made up of incisors, canines, and premolars; as a rule only one premolar is replaced in marsupials. Although the molars erupt late in development and are permanent, that is, not replaced, they are part of the first, or deciduous, dentition.

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Bioscience. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tooth

One of a series of carved ornaments, typically a pyramidal shape or a four-petal flower, usually set in a concave molding band; used in the Romanesque and Gothic Revival styles. See also: Ornament
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

tooth

[′tüth]
(anatomy)
One of the hard bony structures supported by the jaws in mammals and by other bones of the mouth and pharynx in lower vertebrates serving principally for prehension and mastication.
(design engineering)
One of the regular projections on the edge or face of a gear wheel.
An angular projection on a tool or other implement, such as a rake, saw, or comb.
(graphic arts)
The coarse or abrasive quality of a paper or a painting ground that assists in the application of charcoal, pastels, or paint.
A paper texture that holds ink more readily.
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various sharp, horny, chitinous, or calcareous processes on or about any part of an invertebrate that functions like or resembles vertebrate jaws.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tooth

1. In a paint film, a fine texture imparted either by pigments or by the abrasives used in sanding; this texture provides a good base for the adhesion of a subsequent coat of paint.
2. A dogtooth, 2.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tooth

1. any of various bonelike structures set in the jaws of most vertebrates and modified, according to the species, for biting, tearing, or chewing
2. any of various similar structures in invertebrates, occurring in the mouth or alimentary canal
3. any of the various small indentations occurring on the margin of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. any one of a number of uniform projections on a gear, sprocket, rack, etc., by which drive is transmitted
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
$3.75 -- The Northeast: Our region closely follows the South in average Tooth Fairy payout; however, this new amount represents a drop of 60 cents from the previous poll.
"At this rate, they'll be worthless 40 years from now, paving the way for the extinction of the tooth fairy as early as 2060."
When the topic of whether the Tooth Fairy is real or not comes up, she asks her kids if they still believe.
Skeptical Little Rabbit wonders what the Tooth Fairy, if there really is one, will do with her tooth?
Ask someone to take a photo of yo with your tooth fairy pillow and send it in along with your name, age, and address.
That comeuppance arrives early one morning in the form of an involuntary trip to Fairyland and an audience with the Tooth Fairy Matriarch (Julie Andrews, practically perfect in every way), who promptly informs Derek of his violation: killing children's dreams.
Gary Carroll has ridden The Tooth Fairy in all of his three career wins and the accomplished 7lb claimer's decision to switch his mount to the far rail over a furlong out proved mq11-1 shot came home three lengths clear.
Just wait until the tooth fairy realises she could be charging for her services, maybe take a cut of council taxes like the waste disposal people, and Alistair Darling would have an even bigger problem on his hands.
New figures show that tooth fairy inflation has leapt 500 per cent in the last 25 years, while the cost of living has gone up just 150 per cent.
To quote from the review of the hardcover in KLIATT, November 2002: Brought up by a troll in the forest--a troll whose mission in life is to break up the Tooth Fairy's monopoly--Christian grows to young adulthood and falls in love with a princess he spies from afar.
NOT TOO LONG AGO, MY 6-YEAR-OLD SON LOST HIS FIRST TOOTH AND I WAS suddenly thrust into the role of Tooth Fairy for the first time in something like 10 years.
For youngsters on the brink of losing their baby teeth, the Tooth Fairy can serve to get across valuable (in more ways than one) lessons about dental hygiene.