mobility

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mobility

[mō′bil·əd·ē]
(engineering)
The ability of an analytical balance to react to small load changes; affected by friction and degree of looseness in the balance components.
(fluid mechanics)
The reciprocal of the plastic viscosity of a Bingham plastic.
(physics)
Freedom of particles to move, either in random motion or under the influence of fields or forces.
(solid-state physics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mobility

see SOCIAL MOBILITY, OCCUPATIONAL MOBILITY.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

mobility

(1) An umbrella term for portable devices. See mobile device.

(2) The movement of packets in a network. See traffic engineering.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tooth mobility measurements enable an objective assessment of the outcomes of various therapeutic procedures.
In general, all cases presented clinical success, absence of pain, swelling, sinus tract, tenderness to palpation or percus-sion and presented normal tooth mobility.
The aim of this assessment of the tooth mobility is to offer both researchers and clinicians an indication of the state of health of the PDL system of the patient.
Only few Parkinson's disease patients and control subjects had teeth with grades II and III of tooth mobility, 11 and 6 persons, respectively.
Tooth mobility and alveolar bone resorption as a function of occlusal stress and oral hygiene.
A comparative fem-study of tooth mobility using isotropic and anisotropic models of the periodontal ligament.
In multiple logistic regression, age equal or superior to 30 years, smoking, and tooth mobility were associated with a higher risk of having periodontitis.
Numerical simulation of tooth mobility using nonlinear model of the periodontal ligament has been carried out [5].
Periodontal signs are: gingival recession, alveolar bone resorption, tooth mobility, Stillman's striated (Popa, 2004).
This offers the clinician a new method of achieving and maintaining periodontal stability and thus prevention of further periodontal morbidity and subsequent problems like loss of tooth, periodontal abscess, tooth mobility and pain.
Denturists are not trained in the diagnosis or treatment of tooth and gum diseases such as caries, periodontal disease, tooth mobility and occlusion.
The age of incidence varies widely, peaking in the third decade.[4] Leider et al reported multiple lesions in 3 siblings, which implies that a familial distribution may occur in some cases.[4] There is an almost 2:1 male predilection in the solid variant.[3] The lesion may be asymptomatic and incidentally detected in a radiograph, or complaints of tooth mobility, pain, or tenderness (particularly to percussion) may be present.[3] Local swelling and deep pocket formation have been noted.[3,5]