socket

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socket

1. a device into which an electric plug can be inserted in order to make a connection in a circuit
2. Chiefly Brit such a device mounted on a wall and connected to the electricity supply
3. a part with an opening or hollow into which some other part, such as a pipe, probe, etc., can be fitted
4. a spanner head having a recess suitable to be fitted over the head of a bolt and a keyway into which a wrench can be fitted
5. Anatomy
a. a bony hollow into which a part or structure fits
b. the receptacle of a ball-and-socket joint
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

socket

[′säk·ət]
(electricity)
A device designed to provide electric connections and mechanical support for an electronic or electric component requiring convenient replacement.
(engineering)
A device designed to receive and grip the end of a tubular object, such as a tool or pipe.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

socket

1. Same as coupling.
2. British term for bell, 2.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

socket

(networking)
The Berkeley Unix mechansim for creating a virtual connection between processes. Sockets interface Unix's standard I/O with its network communication facilities. They can be of two types, stream (bi-directional) or datagram (fixed length destination-addressed messages). The socket library function socket() creates a communications end-point or socket and returns a file descriptor with which to access that socket. The socket has associated with it a socket address, consisting of a port number and the local host's network address.

Unix manual page: socket(2).
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

socket

(1) A receptacle that receives a plug. See plugs and sockets.

(2) See Unix socket.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Treated rats received cola beverage ad libitum from weaning (23 days old) until tooth extraction at pre-puberty (42 days old) and the tooth sockets were examined either two or three weeks later, at early puberty--the phases of development were defined according to Zanato et al.
"We were cutting the tusk into the long wooden strips." Then, using a chisel and a sledgehammer, they pounded between the tusk and its tooth socket. They had hoped that the long tooth segments would collapse.
The longer the tooth is out of the tooth socket, the less chance it will have to be treated successfully.
Gum infection affects the bony structure of the jaw that holds the teeth in place (the tooth socket), which can lead to tooth loss.
A comparative study of povidone iodine and saline in the irrigation of tooth socket on the complications after surgical removal of impacted wisdom teeth was carried
Their work shows that a tooth can be grown "orthotopically," or in the tooth socket. The result is the tooth can integrate with surrounding tissue in ways that are impossible for dental implants which use hard metals or other materials.
Prolonged immediate bleeding was defined as use of 2nd hemostatic gauze when blood extended beyond the tooth socket after 30 minutes of biting on a pressure pack.
All three theropods had beaks but with vestigial, or functionless, tooth sockets. "Based on these three dinosaurs, we now have evidence for three distinctly different lineages that lose their teeth during postnatal development to have a beak," said Josef Stiegler, a doctoral candidate at the George Washington University in Washington, DC.
Before placing the palatal connective tissue over the recipient site, two approximately 5 mm long sample cores of newly formed tissue were collected for histologic examination from the central region of the former tooth sockets by using the bone chip extractor with a 2.9 mm internal diameter (9126 Komet srl, Italy).
Dawson had to widen the jaw's tooth sockets to remove two molar teeth, which in great apes have telltale curved roots, the researchers say.