tophus

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Related to tophaceous: tophaceous gout

tophus

[′tō·fəs]
(medicine)
A localized swelling principally in cartilage and connective tissues in or adjacent to the small joints of the hands and feet; occurs specifically in gout.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, tophaceous gout causing arthritis of the knee and requiring TKA is rare, (9) and simultaneous subcutaneous and articular tophaceous gout arthritis is exceptionally rare.
In conclusion, the gouty infiltration of tendons and soft tissues should be considered to be a rare differential diagnosis against other soft tissue tumors, even in asymptomatic patients with an unknown hyperuricemia prior to their first tophaceous manifestation.
Spinal cord compression at C1-C2 level due to tophaceous gout (MRI imaging and CT cisternographic findings).
Bullough, "Tophaceous pseudogout (tumoral calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease)," Human Pathology, vol.
It usually begins as self-limited attacks of acute inflammatory arthritis, but the long-standing hyperuricemia causes erosive polyarthritis and chronic tophaceous forms of the disease in some patients.
Gout is defined as the inability to metabolize purine and can present in four different phases: asymptomatic hyperuricemia, recurrent attacks of acute arthritis, intercritical gout, and chronic tophaceous gout.
Lower back pain caused by tophaceous gout of the spine.
For example, one patient who died was a 92-year-old man with severe tophaceous gout who had had three bypass surgeries and a stroke previously, and who succumbed to heart disease.
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dual-energy computed tomography scans showed red-colored uric acid deposits in 20 consecutive patients with clinically obvious tophaceous gout but not in 10 control subjects with other nongout joint conditions.
(7-9) Although the diagnosis of EOA rests upon careful roentgenological reading, analysis of clinical and laboratory findings are the keys to differentiating this disease from other more common interphalangeal arthropathies such as RA, PsA, chronic tophaceous gout, chronic renal diseases and endocrine diseases.
It is a heterogeneous disorder, comprising four phases: asymptomatic hyperuricemia, acute gouty inflammation of joints or bursae, intercritical gout, and chronic tophaceous gout.
Studies consistently show that the goal of therapy should be to reduce serum urate levels to less than 6 mg/dL for the best chance of reducing gouty attacks and tophaceous deposits.