topography

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topography

(təpŏg`rəfē), description or representation of the features and configuration of land surfaces. Topographic maps use symbols and coloring, with particular attention given to the shape and elevations of terrain. Relief is portrayed by means of contourcontour
or contour line,
line on a topographic map connecting points of equal elevation above or below mean sea level. It is thus a kind of isopleth, or line of equal quantity.
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 lines, hachures, shading, or coloring to represent elevations, depressions, and depths of water; natural and human-made features, such as rivers, forests, urbanized areas, bridges, roads, and power lines, are indicated by symbols and color overlays. Topography is often used incorrectly as a synonym for relief; the submarine analogue is bathymetry.

Topography

Physical features of a particular location, including the shape of the surface of the ground.

topography

[tə′päg·rə·fē]
(geography)
The general configuration of a surface, including its relief; may be a land or water-bottom surface.
The natural surface features of a region, treated collectively as to form.

topography

1. the study or detailed description of the surface features of a region
2. the detailed mapping of the configuration of a region
3. the land forms or surface configuration of a region
References in periodicals archive ?
He is the author of The Devil's Topographer: Ambrose Bierce and the American War Story (University of Tennessee Press, 2006).
Axial and tangential power maps are the most commonly available curvature map outputs in most topographers. However, the recognition of the keratoconus on these maps is not easy because there is no simple characteristic pattern.
Gifford had the opportunity to meet with Ruskin, where he discussed his misgivings about Turner's "liberties." Ruskin responded that Turner "treated his subject as a poet, and not as a topographer; that he painted the impression the scene made upon his mind, rather than literal scenes."
In addition to increased legal and technical support, the organization has hired a topographer and secured computer software used to create maps.
The optometrist also purchased a hand-held topographer that can be used for treating patients at remote locations like a nursing home and for wheelchair-bound patients.
This sorry deed is done with the complicity of a lawyer who assumes no responsibility for it, with the blue print drawn by a topographer on top of our existing blue print, with three false witnesses who sign the same identical declaration, and of a mayor (alcalde) who orders the registration on the word of the lawyer, and to an I.D.
For example, Stonewall Jackson's famed topographer, Jedediah Hotchkiss, wrote the volume on Virginia, and Confederate cavalry commander Joseph Wheeler penned the volume on Alabama.
On return to the camp, after a day traveling in wide circles, it was decided the topographer Billy Gillespie should take a shotgun and some shells and go with Jack LaBelle back to the end line and fire off his gun at about noon of the following day.
The new topographies attempt a cartographic comprehensiveness.(28) Hatton's A New View of London (1708) claims to contain "the Names of the Streets, Squares, Lanes, Markets, Courts, Alleys, Rows, Rents, Yards and Inns in London, Westminster, and Southwark"; William Stow's Remarks claims in its title page and again in its preface to "[shew] where every Street, Lane, Court, Alley, Yard, Green, Close, Square, or any other Place, by what Name soever call'd, is situated."(29) In that telling little grammatical moment that reverses the implications of topographic control from the topographer to his spaces, Stow adds: "There is no Place which (to the best of my Knowledge) I have escap'd" (sig.
In addition, he was well known as an author, topographer, and meticulous researcher.
On the same expedition, a topographer surveyed the area for the first map of Crater Lake, and Steel named many of the prominent features, including Wizard Island, the symmetrical cinder cone rising 763 feet out of the water that resembles a medieval wizard's hat.
Not unlike Raymond Queneau in his ever-renewed efforts in Exercises de style, Strauss probes in scene after scene the same territory: first, he gives in minimalist sketches a topographer's quick survey of the barest essentials of a relationship in a linear perspective; but then he attempts, ever anew, to arrest and to register the split seconds of seismic shifts which cut vertically through sequential time and in which the fluidity of personal constellations is fixed in inalterable ways.