topography

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topography

(təpŏg`rəfē), description or representation of the features and configuration of land surfaces. Topographic maps use symbols and coloring, with particular attention given to the shape and elevations of terrain. Relief is portrayed by means of contourcontour
or contour line,
line on a topographic map connecting points of equal elevation above or below mean sea level. It is thus a kind of isopleth, or line of equal quantity.
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 lines, hachures, shading, or coloring to represent elevations, depressions, and depths of water; natural and human-made features, such as rivers, forests, urbanized areas, bridges, roads, and power lines, are indicated by symbols and color overlays. Topography is often used incorrectly as a synonym for relief; the submarine analogue is bathymetry.

Topography

Physical features of a particular location, including the shape of the surface of the ground.

topography

[tə′päg·rə·fē]
(geography)
The general configuration of a surface, including its relief; may be a land or water-bottom surface.
The natural surface features of a region, treated collectively as to form.

topography

1. the study or detailed description of the surface features of a region
2. the detailed mapping of the configuration of a region
3. the land forms or surface configuration of a region
References in periodicals archive ?
Snyder, hundreds of beams produce a dynamic topographical picture.
When color is added, the topographical map turns into a real work of art.
The topographical whorls of Untitled (mountains) and the abstract sweep of vertical bars in Untitled (rain) expand across the waxy surfaces, bleeding to the paper's edges.
Cartographers have created topographical maps of much of the world, but they have overlooked at least one important area: the surfaces of leaves.
(The single 1999 painting included here made for an instructive comparison.) The more recent pieces feature strong, swirling strokes, systematized into terraced bands like topographical isobars.
According to Henry Mullins, a marine geologist at Syracuse University in New York, who first proposed this theory and who also participated in Leg 101, the rifting left both topographical highs and deep gulleys.
Lichtenberg-Ettinger offers intimate, small-scale images, made with photographs from the '30s and '40s taken from newspapers or family albums: photos of children and a doll; naked women in the camps; and aerial and topographical views of Palestine.