torch


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Related to torch: TORCH Test

torch

1. a small portable electric lamp powered by one or more dry batteries
2. any apparatus that burns with a hot flame for welding, brazing, or soldering

torch

[tȯrch]
(building construction)
To apply lime mortar under the top edges of roof tiles or slates.
(engineering)
A gas burner used for brazing, cutting, or welding.
References in classic literature ?
Timing my operations carefully, I held the torch to the small aperture in the door, regulating the intensity of the light by means of the thumb-lever upon the side of the case.
He walked over, the centre of the boat's crew and of the three-score return boys who were all on deck, and flashed his torch on the blanket still lying on the yams.
Van Horn centred his electric torch on the black in the rigging, and saw the long parallel scratches on the fingers of the hand that had invaded Jerry's blanket.
We were in the shrubbery, Raffles with his electric torch drawn and blazing, when we heard the kicking at the pantry door, and in the drive with our bicycles before man and boys poured pell-mell down the steps.
Let them," said Raffles, and brandished his electric torch, our only light as yet.
I glanced at Raffles, and in the white light of his torch he was doing it all with his ankles, exactly as though he had been riding in a Gymkhana.
So saying, he entered the cabin allotted to him, and taking the torch from the domestic's hand, thanked him, and wished him good-night.
The Palmer, having extinguished his torch, threw himself, without taking off any part of his clothes, on this rude couch, and slept, or at least retained his recumbent posture, till the earliest sunbeams found their way through the little grated window, which served at once to admit both air and light to his uncomfortable cell.
With these words, he applied himself to a closer examination of the prostrate form, while Barnaby, holding the torch as he had been directed, looked on in silence, fascinated by interest or curiosity, but repelled nevertheless by some strong and secret horror which convulsed him in every nerve.
The man with the torch complied, although not asked in the most polite terms.
Leave your torch," said Monk; "it would betray your presence, and might procure you a musket-ball.
Monk took up the torch, and brought it to the foot of the column.