Cassidinae

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Cassidinae

 

a subfamily of beetles of the family Chrysomelidae (leaf beetles). The flat body is usually 4–20 mm long (some individuals reach a length of 10 mm in the USSR). The edges of the pronotum and elytra protrude to the sides, forming a shield that covers the top of the head and body (hence the common name of tortoise beetle for several species). The coloration varies and sometimes has a metallic or pearly cast. There are about 1,000 herbivorous species, distributed mainly in the tropics and subtropics. The USSR has 60 species. Some, for example, Cassida nebulosa, are agricultural pests. Adult beetles and the light green larvae, which carry their excrement on their backs, are found on the leaves of beet plants.

References in periodicals archive ?
In leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae), cycloalexy with abdomens oriented outwards is found in one genus of skeletonizing leaf beetles (Galerucinae: Coelomera spp.), at least fifteen tortoise beetle genera (Cassidinae), two genera of shining leaf beetles (Criocerinae: Lema and probably Lilioceris), and several genera of broad-shouldered leaf beetles (Chrysomelinae: Platyphora, probably Chrysophtharta and tentatively Eugonycha and Pterodunga).
Verma, "Cycloalexy in the tortoise beetle, Aspidomorpha miliaris F.
Clavate tortoise beetle, Plagiometriona clavata (Fabricius) Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).
A review of North American tortoise beetles (Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae).
"If an animal like the tortoise beetle is rejected by a lot of predators, it's an incredibly desirable resource to a hunter, because no one else is competing to eat the animal," says Eisner.
Because tortoise beetle larvae are relatively sedentary before pupation, they rarely leave the plant on which they hatch.
The larval developmental rate of the tortoise beetle Metriona elatior Mug (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a potential biocontrol agent of tropical soda apple (TSA) Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae), was studied in the laboratory at 3 constant temperatures (20[degrees], 25[degrees], and 30[degrees]C), photoperiod (14:10 L: D), and relative humidity 60%80% in growth chambers.
But it's really a kind of insect called a tortoise beetle. All insects wear their skeletons on the outside.
Anthracnose resistance exhibited a significant family-mean correlation with tortoise beetle resistance (r = 0.41, P < 0.025, N = 30) and a marginally significant correlation with leaf area (r = 0.33, P = 0.07, N = 30).
In his paintings, one can also see the wild grass, ginger lilies, dragonflies, golden tortoise beetles, among others.
Golden tortoise beetles are jewel-like insects that live mostly in the eastern half of North America.
Here's a new twist on dressing up: The larvae (LAR-vee) of tortoise beetles stick their own poop onto long spines on their backs (right).