totalitarian

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totalitarian

of, denoting, relating to, or characteristic of a dictatorial one-party state that regulates every realm of life
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As Carl Sagan declared at the beginning of his television series Cosmos: "The universe is all that is, all there ever was and all there ever will be." (11) Such totalistic explanations eliminate God, as well as angels, souls, afterlife--indeed, any spiritual entities whatever.
It can be concluded that signifance of critical realism for International Relations theory lies in providing a) an understanding of science that avoids the difficulties of positivist and post positivist approaches, b) a totalistic concept of social reality and c) a concept of structure based on a constitutive relation between the structures and agents thus avoiding both the voluntarism of individualist/ unit based analyses and the determinism of structuralist analyses.
Ideoloogia on totalistlik (totalistic), sest taotleb oma ettekirjutuste vaimus valitseda kogu sotsiaalset ja kultuurielu; ideoloogia on "doktrinaarne", sest kuulutab end valdavat taielikku ning eranditut poliitilist tode; ideoloogia on dualistlik, sest see, kes ei ole minuga, on automaatselt "minu vastu"; ideoloogia on voorutav (alienative), kuivord ta umbusaldab, rundab ja oonestab kehtivaid institutsioone; ideoloogia on futuristlik (futuristic), sest on rakendatud ajaloo utoopilise kulminatsiooni teenistusse.
To live in "gratitude," the affirmation of all that we cannot know (especially as expressed by a voice from the margins: Derrida himself lived as an "outsider," an Algerian Jew in Paris), and to resist totalistic structures and interpretations, is not, after all, so far from Luther's own disdain for theologies of glory; it is a liberative praxis, eliciting both "prayers and tears." (8)
The ensuing contestations about legitimation have become much more intensive bringing out yet in a much more fierce way the contradictions and antinomies in the cultural and political programs of modernity, above all the tensions between pluralistic and totalistic tendencies within them.
But the early search for rationality in Being and Nothingness, in which Sartre claims reality is grounded in the free and responsible self who is ultimately in control of choosing life's meanings through struggle with the generalized other, was summarily displaced by something he called "lived experience." Curiously, it was in the tortured evolution from Hegel to Heidegger that Sartre ended with a position not too dissimilar to the praxis of anarchical fascism, to activity as an exhilarating condition unto itself because it is a "totalistic" experience.
The answer seems to be in whether such societies are pluralistic and open or totalistic and closed.
"Anti-Semitism," Jay continues, became for Horkheimer a model of the "totalistic liquidation of nonidentity" (1995, 99).
Bush of undertaking "a systematic effort to manipulate facts in service to a totalistic ideology that is felt to be more important than the mandates of basic honesty." The President, he said, was "pursuing policies chosen in advance of the facts--policies designed to benefit friends and supporters--and [using] tactics that deprived the American people of any opportunity to effectively subject his arguments to the kind of informed scrutiny that is essential in our system of checks and balances." To top it all off, Gore nervily quoted George Akerlof, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize for Economics, who told Der Spiegel, "This is the worst government the US has ever had in its more than 200 years of history."
For Tolkien, by contrast, totalistic war is the very scourge of modern life, and it becomes the main manifestation of evil in his fiction.