totality


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totality

the state or period of an eclipse when light from the eclipsed body is totally obscured
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

totality

(toh-tal -ă-tee) See eclipse.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

totality

[tō′tal·əd·ē]
(astronomy)
The portion of a total eclipse of the sun during which the sun is entirely covered by the moon at a specified location on the earth's surface.
The portion of a total eclipse of the moon or other body during which the eclipsed body is entirely within the umbra of the eclipsing body.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
In fact, it is not an isolated stimulus that leaves an engram, but the totality of the stimuli at any moment; consequently any portion of this totality tends, if it recurs, to arouse the whole reaction which was aroused before.
There she gave up any possibility of seeing the eclipse herself to count out the seconds of totality for the rest of her party.
Casting a shadow nearly 65 miles wide in totality, the eclipse will be visible in each location within its path for roughly two-minute increments.
Totality - when the Sun is completely obscured - occurs today at 22:11:48 GMT over the South Pacific for four minutes and two seconds.
If a video camera is pointed at the Sun using a fairly large magnification and the protective solar filter is removed a minute or so before totality, a very overexposed image occurs with 'rays' extending from the last bit of the Sun.
Working from a social theory, which recognizes a "capitalist-democratic totality," and responding to recent events and trends indicating that totality is becoming global, Holloway (American Studies, U.
According to homeopathic philosophy, when treatment is based on the totality of symptoms within the mind and body, it will stimulate the organism to move into a state of vibrant health.
Massimo Bartolini's work is tied to nature, understood as inhabited, traveled, and experienced--imbued, in other words, with that totality of emotional, biographical, and cultural elements that we typically connect instead with houses, streets, and urban spaces.
George Fraser, author of Success Runs in Our Race: The Complete Guide to Effective Networking in the African-American Community (HarperCollins; $12.95), calls it "a totality of things that are usually small things."
Moreover, Madigan's emphasis on the understanding of the kitab as a token of access to the totality of God's address to humanity rather than a static and fixed book is extremely important, because the implicit claim to totality and the completeness contained in the word 'book' may open the way to a 'fundamentalism', which identifies the limits of God's kitab with the boundaries of the received text.
He continued, "Efforts to understand depression draw upon the best of our scientific and medical knowledge but sometimes they flag in not adverting to the totality of the human person....