totipotence

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totipotence

[tō′tip·əd·əns]
(embryology)
Capacity of a blastomere to develop into a fully formed embryo.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
SOX2 is another nuclear transcription factor also involved in totipotency. It is also responsible for neuronal differentiation (67) and useful, together with CD30, in the differentiation of solid areas of EC with dysgerminoma.
This remarkable feature, called totipotency, allows for a differentiated cell to dedifferentiate and adopt a proliferative growth pattern (callus), or to deviate towards a developmental program different from the original.
In laboratory language, the latter goal is to avoid totipotency while achieving pluripotency.
Moreover, though iPS cells lack totipotency, (43) the mounting information about the molecules that bind to a protein to regulate the role of that protein in embryogenesis could conceivably lead to the creation of more primitive embryonic phenotypes from iPS cells, which in turn raises the prospect of reproductive cloning.
The recently realized totipotency of somatic cells introduces further ethical (and theological) conundrums that, from the authors' perspective, can be addressed by looking to the central significance of relationships rather than intrinsic properties.
Despite the fact that plant cells display a remarkable potential for cellular totipotency, behaviour of plant cells or explants in tissue culture medium is unpredictable.
The mature progeny that are produced consist of both non-renewing progenitors and terminally differentiated effector cells.[sup.34,36] Stem cells are classified according to their potency, where the hierarchic ordering ranges from totipotency (zygote and its offspring cells of the morula) to pluripotency (embryonic stem cells and embryonic germ cells) and multi-potency (haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells).
However, the effects of cultural factors on the yield, viability and division of protoplast have to be determined to ensure the ability of protoplast undergo totipotency and further regeneration into the whole plant (Winkelmann, 1993).
Self renewal and totipotency are characteristic of stem cells.
These changes in gene expression related transcriptional machinery, chromatin structure and the other cellular functions occurring during several cleavage stages are expected result in a unique chromatin structure capable of maintaining totipotency during embryogenesis and leading to differentiation during the postimplantation development.