toto


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Totò
Birthday
BirthplaceNaples
Died
NationalityItalian
Occupation
comedian
actor
poet
writer
singer
songwriter

toto

(programming)
/toh-toh'/ The default scratch file name among French-speaking programmers - in other words, a francophone foo. The phonetic mutations "titi", "tata", and "tutu" canonically follow "toto", analogously to bar, baz and quux in English.

Toto

pet terrier who accompanies Dorothy to Oz. [Am. Lit.: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz]
See: Dogs
References in classic literature ?
Once Toto got too near the open trap door, and fell in; and at first the little girl thought she had lost him.
At last she crawled over the swaying floor to her bed, and lay down upon it; and Toto followed and lay down beside her.
So Dorothy and Billina and Toto walked up the street and the people seemed no longer to be at all afraid of them.
Toto and Billina followed behind them, behaving very well, and a little way down the street they came to a handsome residence where Aunt Sally Lunn lived.
The people were crowding around Toto and throwing at him everything they could find at hand.
Toto howeled a little as the assortment of bake stuff struck him; but he stood still, with head bowed and tail between his legs, until Dorothy ran up and inquired what the matter was.
With one hand the shaggy man held the apple, which he began eating, while with the other hand he pulled Toto out of his pocket and dropped him to the ground.
Between the branches of the many roads were green meadows and a few shrubs and trees, but she couldn't see anywhere the farm-house from which she had just come, or anything she had ever seen before--except the shaggy man and Toto. Besides this, she had turned around and around so many times trying to find out where she was, that now she couldn't even tell which direction the farm-house ought to be in; and this began to worry her and make her feel anxious.
Toto looked around a minute and dashed up one of the roads.
"Good-bye, Shaggy Man," called Dorothy, and ran after Toto. The little dog pranced briskly along for some distance; when he turned around and looked at his mistress questioningly.
Toto, at this, got up and rubbed his head softly against Dorothy's hand, which she held out to him, and he looked up into her face as if he had understood every word she had said.
"This cat, Toto," she said to him, "is made of glass, so you mustn't bother it, or chase it, any more than you do my Pink Kitten.