towering

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towering

[′tau̇·ə·riŋ]
(meteorology)
A refraction phenomenon; a special case of looming in which the downward curvature of the light rays due to atmospheric refraction increases with elevation so that the visual image of a distant object appears to be stretched in the vertical direction.
References in periodicals archive ?
So when will he quit and surrender his attention to his toweringly lovely wife Slavica,his vast fortune, the luxury hotel he bought in Gstaad, Switzerland, his vast motor-yacht or to whizz around the world in either of his two private jets, one a 50-seater?
It's a life custom-made for screen melodrama, and, focusing on the pain and torment, director Olivier Dahan certainly makes the most of it, the film driven by a toweringly magnificent Oscar-worthy performance by Marion Cotillard who wholly inhabits Piaf from the age of 16 on, brilliantly capturing her mannerisms, voice, egotism and physical appearance.
Garcia the guardian angel was on hand again to hit one of the shots of the tournament, a toweringly precise iron to within 20 feet.
Forget the narrow scoreline, courtesy of the toweringly impressive John Hartson's 46th minute goal.
Possibly the oddest couple in the history of doomed romance, these toweringly insecure sweethearts will soon be each other's ex-factor as sure as night follows day.
Finally, earrings are big, bags are small and shoes are toweringly high.
The meshing of Anthony Ward's constantly shifting, magnificently handsome perspective sets of creepy back-streets, expansive crescents, toweringly high walkways and lowdown dives with Paule Constable's alternately shivery and glowing lighting is masterly.
Graeme Allan comes toweringly to his task as the major who is violently opposed to the production, in which Helen Dyke, Leasa Clarke, Katie Edwards and Amy Leadbeter are prominently involved.
Lyrically filmed by Chris Menges whose camera peers into the soul of landscape and characters alike, and toweringly acted by Jones and Pepper, it's veined with grim, almost absurdist humour, bitter anger and profound tenderness as it plays out a parable of awakening and forgiveness.