toxic epidermal necrolysis


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Related to toxic epidermal necrolysis: Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis

toxic epidermal necrolysis

[¦tak·sik ‚ep·ə‚dər·məl nə′kräl·ə·səs]
(medicine)
Intraepidermal blistering and separation of the outer epidermis, giving the appearance and the management problems of a scald, caused by infection with Staphylococcus aureus strains producing one of the epidermolytic toxins, usually of phage group II. Also known as scalded skin syndrome.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Relevance and consequences of erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in gynecology.
Retrospective analysis of steven Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis over a period of 5 years from northern Karnataka, India.
Incidence of toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens- Johnson Syndrome in an HIV cohor t: an obser vational retrospective case series study.
Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis is a variant of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.
Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in sub-Saharan Africa: A multicentric study in four countries.
Whereas Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis has a higher mortality (30-35%); Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and transitional forms correspond to the same syndrome but with less extensive skin detachment and a lower mortality (5-15%).
Patients and Methods: All patients with cutaneous drug eruptions seen at the Dermatology Department of Mayo Hospital, Lahore, over 6 months were enrolled and the pattern of drug eruptions like urticaria, angioedema, fixed drug eruption, maculopapular rash, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis etc.
Petkov T, Pehlivanov G, Grozdev I, Kavaklieva S, Tsankov N: Toxic epidermal necrolysis as a dermatological manifestation of drug hypersensitivity syndrome.
Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and StevensJohnson syndrome (SJS) are acute life-threatening conditions, most often elicited by drugs and less often by infection.